playing chess – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 21:42:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-16.png playing chess – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ 32 32 Hayden High Good Kids Are Terrific Championship Chess Players https://tromsosjakklubb.com/hayden-high-good-kids-are-terrific-championship-chess-players/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 21:42:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/hayden-high-good-kids-are-terrific-championship-chess-players/ TOPEKA (WIBW) — Matthew Samich and Ethan Rochford, two freshmen at Hayden High, love chess. About four years ago the school had a very strong chess team, then it fell apart because Hayden just didn’t have enough students interested in joining the chess club. These two young men are trying to interest more students. Matthew […]]]>

TOPEKA (WIBW) — Matthew Samich and Ethan Rochford, two freshmen at Hayden High, love chess. About four years ago the school had a very strong chess team, then it fell apart because Hayden just didn’t have enough students interested in joining the chess club. These two young men are trying to interest more students. Matthew has competed at very high levels and will play nationally.

Ethan started playing chess in 5th grade at Christ The King Catholic School. He hadn’t really played chess much in the past two years due to tournaments being canceled due to Covid, and no one can really play him at home! Over the past few months, Ethan (the player wearing the glasses) has been playing a lot online and was able to participate in three tournaments recently. This qualified him to go to State in Emporia, where now his rating has really improved recently after getting a few tournaments under his belt. He’s really looking forward to improving his grade even further, and our Good Kids are hoping to put together a chess team at Hayden High.

Matthew’s fatjer taught him the game when he was just a kindergartener and in first grade! Matthew started playing tournaments around 2nd and 3rd grade. He said his most exciting moment was making his best shots in the national tournament in Nashville – and placed 51st in Grade 7. One of Matthew’s proudest moments was last week when he won the Chanute Tournament and had to beat one of the best players in the state. Another proud moment took place two years ago when he was in grade 7 and he moved up to high school and won the high school tournament! The Kansas State Championship was held at Emporia this month, where he was looking forward to playing against some of the state Grandmasters.

Ethan also participated in the State Chess Tournament at Emporia State. He took 16th place out of 124 kids with 4 points. It was a tough competition, everyone he played against was ranked higher than him. There were 124 children in the K-12 section. Matthew placed 5th and Ethan placed 16th. They did fantastic. Matthew had 5 points and Ethan had 4 points. Congratulations to this week’s Good Kids and to the amazing young chess players, Matthew Samich and Ethan Rochford!

Copyright 2022 WIBW. All rights reserved.

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Checkmate! National Chess Tournament moves to Collingwood https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-national-chess-tournament-moves-to-collingwood/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 14:30:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-national-chess-tournament-moves-to-collingwood/ New tournament in Collingwood on May 7 and 8; organizer hoping to attract national grandmasters Playing chess can be good for the mind, but if you’re good at it, it can also be good for the wallet. The Canadian Chess Federation will hold its first chess tournament in Collingwood on May 7-8 at the Living […]]]>

New tournament in Collingwood on May 7 and 8; organizer hoping to attract national grandmasters

Playing chess can be good for the mind, but if you’re good at it, it can also be good for the wallet.

The Canadian Chess Federation will hold its first chess tournament in Collingwood on May 7-8 at the Living Stone Resort. Brought to town by organizer and Collingwood resident Milan Somborac, this year’s event is set to become an annual tournament, bringing competitors to Collingwood from across Canada.

Somborac was born in Belgrade, Serbia. He remembers that in Belgrade, chess is to people what hockey is to Canadians.

“They erect statues to chess champions,” he said. “It’s part of the culture there.”

Somborac says he’s noticed over the years that chess culture isn’t as big in Canada, which has led him to do what he can to start a local tournament. In the past, he says he taught a chess class at Georgian College, which led to the formation of a local chess club.

“Collingwood is a very attractive community. It has a high recognition factor for a community of its size. Everyone has heard of Collingwood,” he said. “If we hold this as an annual festival, it will be another Collingwood attraction.”

The Canadian Chess Federation (CFE), founded in 1872, is a registered non-profit organization whose mandate is to promote and encourage the knowledge, study and play of chess. Celebrating 150 years in 2022, it is the national governing body for chess in Canada.

This year, Somborac invested $3,000 of its own funds as prize money for the Collingwood tournament ($1,500 for first place, $1,000 for second and $500 for third), which hopefully he, will bring forth masters and grandmasters this year and in the years to come.

He is also looking for sponsors to help fund the event over time.

“I would like to create something that will continue,” he said.

Membership in the Canadian Chess Federation is required for all participants and can be purchased upon registration.

More information on all CFC events can be viewed here.

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Ernest Levert Jr. finds a home for the Cooperative Chess Cultural Center https://tromsosjakklubb.com/ernest-levert-jr-finds-a-home-for-the-cooperative-chess-cultural-center/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 20:33:54 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/ernest-levert-jr-finds-a-home-for-the-cooperative-chess-cultural-center/ November 28, 2021 was one of the best days yet for Ernest Levert Jr. Olde Towne East’s bi-weekly Chess Rallies at Upper Cup Coffee on Parsons Avenue. After meeting regularly from 3-6 p.m. on the second and fourth Sundays of every month for about six months, more than 30 people came to the event on […]]]>

November 28, 2021 was one of the best days yet for Ernest Levert Jr. Olde Towne East’s bi-weekly Chess Rallies at Upper Cup Coffee on Parsons Avenue. After meeting regularly from 3-6 p.m. on the second and fourth Sundays of every month for about six months, more than 30 people came to the event on the last Sunday in November. A chessboard topped each table in the shop.

With so many people crammed into a small space during an ongoing pandemic, Levert’s anxiety surfaced, so he stepped out into the cold to greet people in an effort to keep people from congregating inside the store. Sitting at a table on the sidewalk, Levert looked across the street and noticed a sign outside an old tattoo shop. The space was available. A place like this, right across from the Upper Cup, could not only be an overflow room for chess events; it could be a community gathering space and the future home of a chess training center.

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Airthings Masters Day 3: Nepo remains in the lead; Carlsen takes second https://tromsosjakklubb.com/airthings-masters-day-3-nepo-remains-in-the-lead-carlsen-takes-second/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 23:31:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/airthings-masters-day-3-nepo-remains-in-the-lead-carlsen-takes-second/ Managing director Ian Nepomniachtchi leads by a huge seven-point margin, while managing directors Magnus Carlsen, Vladislav Artemiev and Vincent Keymer are the main contenders for the qualifying places. How to watch? Master Airthings | Ranking of the 3rd day # fed Player Rtg Points 1 […]]]>

Managing director Ian Nepomniachtchi leads by a huge seven-point margin, while managing directors Magnus Carlsen, Vladislav Artemiev and Vincent Keymer are the main contenders for the qualifying places.

How to watch?

Master Airthings | Ranking of the 3rd day




















# fed Player Rtg Points
1 Nepomniachtchi, Ian 2773 27/36
2 Carlsen, Magnus 2865 20/36
3 Artemiev, Vladislav 2700 20/36
4 Clemer, Vincent 2664 20/36
5 Giri, Anise 2772 19/36
6 Hansen, Eric 2606 19/36
7 Abdusatorov, Nodirbek 2651 18/36
8 Esipenko, Andrei 2714 18/36
9 Ding, Liren 2799 18/36
ten Aronian, Levon 2772 17/36
11 Le, Quang Liem 2709 15/36
12 Praggnanandhaa R 2612 15/36
13 Duda, Jan-Krzysztof 2760 12/36
14 Niemann, Hans Moke 2642 11/36
15 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar 2767 11/36
16 Kosteniuk, Alexandra 2516 0/36

I would like to start with a disclaimer. For some reason, I didn’t feel in the mood to write my usual detailed analysis today, and instead took the position of a spectator, simply enjoying the games. This report will show some fragments from today’s games that caught my eye.

The first lap was a bit uneven. I’ll start with a special case of mutual errors in the game between GM Jan-Krzysztof Duda and GM Levon Aronian.

Nepomniachtchi could easily have added another victory to his tally by beating Keymer in a technical finale.

I praised GM Le Quang Liem’s ​​consistent play through the first two days, but he couldn’t maintain his late game composure at the start of day three. It didn’t help that his opponent was called Magnus Carlsen.

The next round brought another shocking upset. GM Eric Hansen beat the world champion with Black. Granted, Magnus blundered badly, but credit where credit is due, Eric played his opener, the classic Ruy Lopez, and never backed down.

In other important developments, I would mention the steady progress of General Manager Anish Giri. After a lackluster performance on Day One, Anish gradually picked up speed, when his third straight victory (the last over GM Ding Liren) catapulted him to a split second place. Ding, on the other hand, begins to show the ill effects of playing chess in the middle of the night. Life is hard for the Chinese number 1.

Anish Giri Airthings Masters 2022
Giri picks up the pace after their third straight win. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

The last game to end was an Artemiev victory over Aronian, which saw the Russian grab the final qualifying spot with five laps to go.

Round 11 began with a grandmaster draw between Ding and Carlsen. All things considered, we should be lenient with the players, as none of them are in a fun tournament right now. Sometimes a short breath is enough to correct the course of the ship. A big battle between Hansen and general manager Nodirbek Abdusattorov almost turned in favor of the Canadian, but Eric took too long and got into the wrong tactic.

On the handlebars of this victory, the young fast world champion found himself right in the middle. His chances got even better with a miraculous escape from bad position against Ding Liren in Round 12.

In the meantime, Artemiev continued his late push by winning a fine match against Keymer – match of the day that is.

Vlad nearly made it a perfect 4/4, but he couldn’t convert his extra pawn against GM Shakhriyar Mamedyarov in Round 12. A well-rested Carlsen caught him beating Duda with surprising ease. Didn’t Bobby Fischer say the Dragon was easy: open the h file, the bag and the companion?

Carlsen and Artemiev are joined in a tie for second place by Keymer, who never seems to go away and bounces back from losses. He did it again by beating GM Hans Niemann to conclude day three.

Let’s take a look at the leaderboard and estimate the players’ chances of making the top eight.

Obviously, Nepo has already passed. His huge total of 27 points (9.5/12 and two points clear of the field under the old scoring system) will take care of that. Truth be told, with a little more care, Ian could have picked up two more wins today if he hadn’t lost a big late game advantage to Keymer and Le. Still, his speed continues to impress. Nepo literally goes through every game, spending just over five minutes of his time. Whether his confidence holds up heading into the playoffs is another story altogether.

Airthings Masters 2022 Ian Nepomniachtchi
Nepo is already in the playoffs. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

Carlsen’s high-profile struggles shouldn’t make much of a difference once the playoffs begin. I feel like Magnus doesn’t really care what position he’ll be in. According to the media, the first enemy he must defeat is the Covid-19. I’m not really in a position to elaborate on medical matters, but I’m confident a 31-year-old in fine form will pull through.

I think Artemiev has already proven his class. His only two losses have come to Carlsen and Ding, and there aren’t many players left who can top him. I guess Vlad is going to be in the playoffs.

Airthings Masters 2022 Artemiav
Artemiev proved he was a force to be reckoned with. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

The rest is a big mess. I would like to see Keymer, Abdusattorov and, in particular, Hansen do it. However, experience counts in this business, and I think Giri and Aronian will be there. Not safe for Ding, however, the time zone situation is brutal. Le Quang Liem and PR are not left behind, but they are going to need a big boost. Either way, only three laps tomorrow separate us from all the answers.

All Games Day 3

The Champions Chess Tour 2022 Airthings Masters takes place February 19-27 on chess24. The preliminary phase is a rapid round robin (15+10) with 16 players. The top eight players qualify for a knockout which consists of one four-game rapid match during the quarter-finals and semi-finals and two four-match rapid matches during the final. The game switches to blitz (5 + 3) and armageddon (white has five minutes, black has four with no increment) only decides if a knockout match ends in a tie. The total prize money for the event is $150,000, with $750 for each win and $250 for each draw in the preliminaries.

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Trevor Noah: Russia loves to play chess https://tromsosjakklubb.com/trevor-noah-russia-loves-to-play-chess/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 07:17:05 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/trevor-noah-russia-loves-to-play-chess/ “But America is certain – it is certain – that Russia is still planning to invade. In fact, today the US Secretary of State even said that what Russia could do to justify an invasion is to launch fake or even real chemical weapons at itself and then blame the ‘Ukraine. Yeah, yeah, first of […]]]>

“But America is certain – it is certain – that Russia is still planning to invade. In fact, today the US Secretary of State even said that what Russia could do to justify an invasion is to launch fake or even real chemical weapons at itself and then blame the ‘Ukraine. Yeah, yeah, first of all, uh, spoilers, hello! — TREVOR NOAH

“Secondly, can you imagine this, staging a chemical attack on yourself to justify your invasion? It’s pretty messed up, especially for the Russian soldiers who have to carry out the mission: [imitating Russian soldier] “So we throw that at ourselves but it’s fake, huh?” [imitating another Russian soldier] “Yes, we will know when the bomb explodes. Mystery, excitement.’” — TREVOR NOAH

“And you know, people, as erratic as the Russians’ actions may seem, you understand what they’re doing right now, don’t you? They are playing chess. This is literally what chess is: [imitating chess player] ‘Oh, I’m moving on. I move back. I attack. No I’m not. The horse goes this way, then it turns. That’s what Russia does – and Russians love to play chess. They were designed for this moment. Meanwhile, the rest of us don’t play chess anymore. We love silly games now. We’re like, ‘Uh, I need a five-letter word that ends in de. Plaque? No.'” — TREVOR NOAH

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Telegraph chess players ‘appalled’ after games halted by altercation with gun https://tromsosjakklubb.com/telegraph-chess-players-appalled-after-games-halted-by-altercation-with-gun/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 00:45:15 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/telegraph-chess-players-appalled-after-games-halted-by-altercation-with-gun/ Chess players play at the free chess club on Telegraph Avenue. 1 credit Community chess games on Telegraph Avenue are suspended due to safety concerns after organizer Jesse Sheehan was injured trying to restrain a man who brought a gun to the tables, players say Chess, Sheehan and Berkeley Police. California students, residents and passersby […]]]>
Chess players play at the free chess club on Telegraph Avenue. 1 credit

Community chess games on Telegraph Avenue are suspended due to safety concerns after organizer Jesse Sheehan was injured trying to restrain a man who brought a gun to the tables, players say Chess, Sheehan and Berkeley Police.

California students, residents and passersby have been playing chess for free since last summer, when Sheehan organized community donations for a chess club at the corner of Telegraph Avenue and Haste Street.

On January 31, Sheehan and Brandon Buters, another chess club regular who goes by the name “Soul,” were involved in an altercation with a man who had in his possession a “12-gauge, side-loading shotgun.” gun-style mouth” at the tables, according to Berkeley police spokesman Byron White.

The three men were arrested. Sheehan was arrested on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon and Buters was arrested for aggravated assault. The man with the gun was arrested on suspicion of carrying a concealed firearm and battery with bodily harm.

Sheehan said he was setting the tables that morning as he does every weekday when a man who had once threatened players at the tables arrived in the area. According to Sheehan, the man had indicated to a player and a coach a week earlier that he had a gun and wanted to shoot someone.

When the man arrived at the tables on Jan. 31, Sheehan said the man asked to play with him. Sheehan said he refused and started walking to his car to retrieve his cellphone with the intention of calling the police. At this point, Sheehan said he and Buters observed the man talking to each other and holding his bag in a disturbing manner.

Sheehan said the man then jumped on Buters, who pushed him away, and the man then lunged for his bag as Sheehan returned to the tables to block his access to the bag. During the ensuing altercation, Sheehan was able to grab the bag with the gun inside and cross the street to a local dispensary, who secured the gun inside. their doors.

“My adrenaline shot up, I screamed ‘Help, he’s got a gun,'” Sheehan said, adding that he then asked the clinic to call the police.

Police say Buters punched the man in the face multiple times, causing him “serious bodily harm” including a bloody mouth and a missing tooth. The man kicked Buters back, causing him an open wound that required stitches to his right ring finger. Police said Sheehan struck the man with a pipe, causing a visible injury to his arm.

“I said, ‘Man, I don’t want to hurt you, stay back! ‘” Sheehan recounted before hitting the man with the object. At this point, he said their objective was to hold the man until the police arrived on the scene. Buters and Sheehan were restraining the man when the police arrived, and Sheehan said it would have appeared to the officers that “at first glance it was two white people hitting a black person”.

Sheehan and Buters were handcuffed, Sheehan said, while officers spoke to the other man and eventually recovered the gun and bag from the nearby dispensary.

Sheehan, Buters and the man found with the gun were all incarcerated in Santa Rita Jail and released on bail or bond and receiving treatment at local hospitals. Buters and Sheehan said Tuesday they are still recovering and trying to stay positive about the potential consequences ahead. Sheehan was the only one to post bail, while Buters and the other man were cited free, according to police.

The three men have not yet been charged, according to records from the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office.

Sheehan hasn’t officially hosted the games since Jan. 31. He was never arrested in Berkeley and said he suffered from PTSD preventing him from returning to the area and inviting others to play there. Chess players who held their own game around the corner last week told Berkeleyside, they were devastated by what had happened and concerned about Sheehan’s injuries.

“With this looming threat…it’s one thing if people decide to pull out a board and play around, it’s another for me to set up a chess cafe and make it nice and safe. “Sheehan said, explaining that he can’t in good conscience host the games if he thinks patrons would be threatened.

He criticized Berkeley police for failing to restrain the man during his arrest and for failing to respond to reports that the man continued to threaten the group of chess players. After the man was released on bail, Sheehan said he was told he had returned to the area and had additional weapons and would return with them to harm someone.

“What I’ve seen from the Berkeley Police Department, they’re not interested in Telegraph Avenue security,” Sheehan added. “I don’t like the connotation of [the attack] with the chess club, but if it hadn’t been for our tables and chairs, he would have done it to someone on the sidewalk.

Sheehan is considering filing a restraining order against the man and has filed an additional report with UC police. He is due back in court in April.

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Richmond Chess Club returns after 120 years https://tromsosjakklubb.com/richmond-chess-club-returns-after-120-years/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 13:32:51 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/richmond-chess-club-returns-after-120-years/ The Richmond and Twickenham Chess Club has returned to the Adelaide Inn on Park Road, Teddington, after 120 years. The club, formerly known as Twickenham Chess Club, reopened on January 4, after decades of moving and two months without a venue. Just over 120 years ago, in October 1901, the Surrey Comet announced that the […]]]>

The Richmond and Twickenham Chess Club has returned to the Adelaide Inn on Park Road, Teddington, after 120 years.

The club, formerly known as Twickenham Chess Club, reopened on January 4, after decades of moving and two months without a venue.

Just over 120 years ago, in October 1901, the Surrey Comet announced that the Richmond Chess Club would play at the Adelaide Inn, then known as the Clarence Hotel. The club described the venue as a “popular, friendly pub” and invited members to weekly social test matches.

Daniel O’Shaughnessy, 58, of Atbara Road, Teddington, is a local chess coach and has been with the club since the 1980s.

He said: “I have been involved with the club for years and we have encountered obstacles along the way, but we are happy to be back in our place of origin.”

According to Richmond Council, chess club membership has doubled since 2020 due to renewed interest in chess during national shutdowns, and the Queen’s Gambit series on Netflix.

The period drama, written by Scott Frank and starring Anya Taylor-Joy, depicts the story of a young girl learning to play chess while dealing with drug addiction and the loss of her parents.

Following the show’s release in 2020, eBay reported a 216% increase in sales of chess-related products.

Maria Prescott, 33, is an administrative assistant and lives on King Street, Twickenham. She joined the Richmond and Twickenham Chess Club in 2020.

She said: “The sport is very mentally demanding, but I feel like I’m getting better every time I play.”

Prescott was inspired by her friend to start performing.

She said: “There are hardly any girls playing chess, so when my friend became interested in the sport, I thought it would be nice to try it with her. We really appreciate it so far”.

The weekly tournaments will take place every Tuesday evening from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

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U Chess Club Wins 2022 Pan Am Intercollegiate Championship – The Daily Utah Chronicle https://tromsosjakklubb.com/u-chess-club-wins-2022-pan-am-intercollegiate-championship-the-daily-utah-chronicle/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 21:02:25 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/u-chess-club-wins-2022-pan-am-intercollegiate-championship-the-daily-utah-chronicle/ (Photo by Vlada Karpovich | Courtesy of Pexels) Living on turkey sandwiches and cereal for the week, the University of Utah Chess Club has had great success in Pan American Intercollegiate Championship Team Chess Tournament in January 2022. As this was the first year the chess club could take on two teams, the Pan American […]]]>

(Photo by Vlada Karpovich | Courtesy of Pexels)

Living on turkey sandwiches and cereal for the week, the University of Utah Chess Club has had great success in Pan American Intercollegiate Championship Team Chess Tournament in January 2022.

As this was the first year the chess club could take on two teams, the Pan American tournament was already of major importance. Additionally, U’s B-Team member Dhruvan Gopinath won second place Top Upset Plaque, and the A-Team came in second place in the Third Division.

In short, an upset occurs when a lower ranked player defeats a higher ranked player, thereby increasing their own ranking and proving their level of skill.

Playing against Grandmasters, as students who had never played Pan American, was a huge win for the chess team.

“It’s a really prestigious international collegiate championship,” said Conrad Morris, a member of Team A. “Our Team A tied for first and lost the tie-breaks.”

Morris said the tournament was a great team-building experience.

“The game of chess…is a battle of the mind,” he said. “It’s like this dance, this interaction of ideas, and whoever has the strongest ideas ends up winning the game.”

Gopinath described the game as maximizing his pieces’ potential while minimizing the opponent’s potential.

“Every move is absolutely essential for position and when your opponent makes a move, you have to consider every possible aspect that that move accomplishes,” Gopinath said in an email interview. “You must then react accordingly, make sure you don’t miss any traps or tricks.”

Robert Williams, the coach of the chess team, started playing chess in the seventh grade, continuing to play with his junior high and high school league.

He played on his college chess team, competing in the 1977 Pan Am in St. Louis, Missouri. This, he said, is how the goal of the Pan American tournament began.

Williams built the U chess club from the ground up, starting in 2003. While there had been other chess clubs in the past, none had lasted very long. When the Chess Club was restarted, Williams wanted to focus on intercollegiate chess competition.

“It took a few years,” he said. “But eventually we started getting students to go to Pan-American.”

He said some of the difficulties they faced were bad weather, booking rooms and COVID-19 restrictions, saying their perseverance through this was emblematic of teamwork at the club.

“Success is student safety, with students being team players and students doing their best,” he said.

According to Williams, diversity and club cohesion are necessary for the team to truly succeed.

supporters of the chess club, including those in the tournament and outside, in addition to the teamwork of the club, have made possible the success of these students.

If interested in the chess club, students can attend club meetings Thursday nights at 6 p.m. MST in the Union.

“It’s not just a game for intellectuals,” Williams said. “It’s a game for everyone.”

[email protected]

@KaileyGilbert3

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Netflix Can’t Checkmate Chess Grandmaster in ‘Queen’s Gambit’ Libel Lawsuit – The Hollywood Reporter https://tromsosjakklubb.com/netflix-cant-checkmate-chess-grandmaster-in-queens-gambit-libel-lawsuit-the-hollywood-reporter/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 21:18:06 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/netflix-cant-checkmate-chess-grandmaster-in-queens-gambit-libel-lawsuit-the-hollywood-reporter/ Netflix has lost a bid to end a lawsuit from a Georgian chess champion who says she was defamed in an episode of The Queen’s Bet. In September, Nona Gaprindashvili sued Netflix in response to a fictional chess commentator’s line in the series finale, who refers to her by name and says she’s “the world […]]]>

Netflix has lost a bid to end a lawsuit from a Georgian chess champion who says she was defamed in an episode of The Queen’s Bet.

In September, Nona Gaprindashvili sued Netflix in response to a fictional chess commentator’s line in the series finale, who refers to her by name and says she’s “the world champion and has never confronted by men”. She argues that the statement is false and sexist.

On Thursday, U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips found the streaming giant acted with a “reckless disregard” for the truth, rejecting arguments that it could not be sued for defaming real people in works of fiction. “To the contrary, the fact that the series is a work of fiction does not insulate Netflix from liability for defamation if all elements of defamation are otherwise present,” she wrote.

The Emmy-winning series chronicles the rise of fictional American chess player Elizabeth Harmon. The show, which topped the streaming charts for three straight weeks, culminates with Harmon beating the top Russian players in the 1960s at the height of the Cold War.

The show is based on a 1983 novel by Walter Tevi, but it references real chess players, including this passing reference to Gaprindashvili in a scene that compares his accomplishments to Harmon’s.

In a motion to strike the complaint under California’s anti-SLAPP law, Netflix argued that no viewer would have understood the line to convey a statement of fact because the series is fiction and “the works of fiction have no obligation to be truthful”.

But Phillips ruled she was not aware of any cases that ruled out defamation claims for the depiction of real people in otherwise fictional works. However, it should be noted that these types of cases – such as those involving the Injured locker, Straight outta Compton, the wolf of Wall Street and Rivalry: Bette and Joan – often end in a loss for disgruntled subjects, which ultimately bodes well for Netflix.

Here, despite some of the fictional elements of the allegedly defamatory line, the judge said she could not ignore that she identified Gaprindashvili by name and that the show referred to real people and events.

“Not only does it bridge the gap between the association of the supposedly fictional character with the real person, whether or not viewers recognized the name of the claimant (as indeed some did), viewers may reasonably have believed that the commentary was one of those historical details incorporated into the series,” she wrote.

Netflix also argued that it didn’t defame Gaprindashvili because viewers wouldn’t find the statement that she “never faced men” to be derogatory. The streaming giant said the involvement is inconsistent with the series’ depiction of the structural barriers that hindered the advancement of women in elite chess during the 1960s.

Phillips interpreted the line in a different way. She found that it “clearly conveys an importance to the very achievement of playing chess against men – not only because men were supposed to be better at chess, but also because it was a monumental achievement to break into this. world”.

At the very least, the judge said the comment dismisses Gaprindashvili’s accomplishment, which constitutes a reputational attack that could harm his career.

Phillips found that Netflix acted maliciously in the performance, a necessary part of a defamation case, as the show’s showrunners changed the line of the novel it’s based on. The novel states that Gaprindashvili was a gambler who “had met all these great Russian masters many times before”.

Netflix declined to comment on the decision, which is embedded below.

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Chess Player Shares His Life Philosophy With Iowa State Students | News https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-player-shares-his-life-philosophy-with-iowa-state-students-news/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 01:34:17 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-player-shares-his-life-philosophy-with-iowa-state-students-news/ David Skaar wears his favorite party hat while playing chess at Memorial Union. Maris Cameron/Iowa State Daily Many students have seen David Skaar sitting at a Memorial Union table with his board and boombox, waiting for someone to join him. You may have sat down to play chess with him before. “Chess is like a […]]]>






David Skaar wears his favorite party hat while playing chess at Memorial Union.



Many students have seen David Skaar sitting at a Memorial Union table with his board and boombox, waiting for someone to join him. You may have sat down to play chess with him before.

“Chess is like a game of life,” Skaar said. “Winning, losing or drawing, it has its limits and we can’t dwell on the moves we made or didn’t make.”

Retired at 66, Skaar now devotes his time to showing students various chess strategies. Wearing his favorite party hat and listening to the Beatles on a portable boombox, Skaar regularly studies and teaches chess at Memorial Union, North Grand Mall and Welch Ave.

Born in 1955 in Story City, Iowa, Ames resident David Skaar discovered his passion for the game of chess early on. The youngest of four children and a graduate of Scott Community College, Skaar, at 27, has traveled and competed in various chess tournaments in Los Angeles.

Skaar worked as a motorcycle mechanic for many years until his mother passed away in 2002. Putting his family first, Skaar returned to Iowa in November 2003 to care for his father for the next seven years. of his life.

Referencing books like “My 60 Memorable Games” by Bobby Fischer, Skaar shares valuable chess lessons, including the difference between descriptive and algebraic notation on chess boards and how to get an opponent to “checkmate“. in five strokes.

“I try to be a positive in the lives of these kids while they’re here,” Skaar said. “As a teacher of the game, it’s my job to simplify the rules, so they can understand and no longer doubt their abilities. If I can’t do that, then I’ve failed as a teacher.

Besides being an avid chess player, Skaar shares his philosophy of life and love with the Iowa State community.

“Tell your parents you love them and enjoy your youth,” Skaar said. “Time flies for all of us and it’s fun to learn, grow and experience all of the possibilities available to you with the ones you love.”

Skaar encourages students to take every opportunity that comes their way in the state of Iowa, because life can be full of surprises too.

“Like the knight’s piece in chess, life is most surprising,” Skaar said. “He has the special ability to jump at you from all sorts of directions, and you never see it coming.”

Skaar tells students to become the best version of themselves and find happiness in their work and play far beyond the time they graduate. Skaar himself shows students how he finds joy in the arts, drawing and listening to his favorite rock music.

Skaar not only plays chess with Iowa State students in his spare time, but he also plays poker and Yahtzee with residents of the Mainstream Living Alzheimer’s Unit in Ames. Skaar became a certified caregiver and was a caregiver at Mainstream Living before retiring.

Skaar continues to promote chess by working with the Iowa State Chess Club, playing games with other students, and solving puzzles as a group. Students interested in joining can attend club meetings from 6-8 p.m. Mondays at Carver 204.

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