Chess – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 19:26:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-16.png Chess – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ 32 32 Analyze This: Rational and Irrational Chess https://tromsosjakklubb.com/analyze-this-rational-and-irrational-chess/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 16:43:48 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/analyze-this-rational-and-irrational-chess/ “I won a pawn but misplayed the position and was totally knocked out. Then he missed a knight fork and I had a game won before hanging my queen. So we agreed of a draw — Every chess player at least once It’s a dirty little secret we’re not supposed to discuss, but the games […]]]>

“I won a pawn but misplayed the position and was totally knocked out. Then he missed a knight fork and I had a game won before hanging my queen. So we agreed of a draw — Every chess player at least once

It’s a dirty little secret we’re not supposed to discuss, but the games you tend to see in instruction manuals, glossy anthologies and newspaper articles (ahem) don’t always accurately reflect chess because they are actually played by the vast majority of us. . Like a TV sitcom that sums up a major life crisis in 22 tidy minutes, your typical chess annotator seeks games with an intelligible opening, logical development, satisfying ending, and (at most) an unlikely change of fortune.

But for many of us, chess on the chessboard can be a dizzying rollercoaster of fates, with advantage often swinging wildly between players like a badminton shuttlecock as errors and misjudgments pile up. . Play your games with today’s super powerful engines, and you’ll appreciate even more how often fortunes can turn on a dime in over-the-board gaming.

To illustrate this point, consider the two games offered today, both from recent tournaments.

Polish star GM Jan-Krzysztof Duda’s victory over Dutch GM Anish Giri in the Meltwater Champions Chess Tour final that just ended last week is the delight of columnists: White throws a speculative piece sacrifice, Black can’t handle the pressure and Duda finishes things off with a brilliant and decisive second sacrifice leading to a matting attack. Winner and commentator can look like geniuses explaining the perfectly explainable course of events.

Duda had actually played piece sacrifice in this QGD Ragozin line before (13. c4!? h4 14. Be5 f5 15. cxd5) in a quick game last year against GM Yu Yangyi, but the Chinese star found 17 … Qxd5! (instead of Giri’s 17…Kg7?) 18. Ng6+ Kg7 19. Nxh8 Qxb3 20. Rxc7+ Kxh8 21. axb3 Nd5! and held the draw. Here the queens remain on the board and after 19. 0-0! (with black’s king so exposed, white is in no hurry to recover his lost material, coldly ending his development) g4?! (Rf8 was harder) 20. f4! Kf8 21. e4 and the mobilized white pawn center will sweep everything in front of it.

Black’s desperate search for counterplay only leaves him more exposed to a devastating strike: 24. Bb1 Qd2 25. Qf3 Bxf5 26. exf5 Qxd4+ 27. Kh1 Rc8 (see diagram; 27…Qxe5 28. Qg4+ Kh8 29. Qxh4+ Kg8 30. Qh7 mate ) 28. Rg7+!! Kxg7 (Kh8 29. f6 Qxe5 30. Kh7+ Kg8 31. Qg4+ and checkmate next) 29. f6+, leading to a brilliant king hunt. Then 29…Kh6 (Kh6 loses to 30. Bh7+! Kxh7 31. Qh5+ Kg8 32. Qg6+) 30. Ng4+ Kg5 31. Qf5+ !! (a tactic White needed to see before embarking on the rook sacrifice) Nxf5 32. Rxf5+ Kg6 (Kxg4 33. h3 is a very satisfying mate) 33. Re5+, and Black resigned, not needing de voir 33…Kf7 34. Ke7+ Kg8 35 Nh6+ Kh8 36. Kh7 mate.

Just the qualities your annotator wants in a game – simple, straightforward, principled, inspired but not too messy, with a deserving winner.

—-

Now consider the savage battle between Filipino GM Mark Paragua and 12-year-old Nigerian American prodigy Tani Adewumi at the New York GM/IM Fall Invitational earlier this month. Adewumi won her third IM standard in the GMB section of the event, while dealing Paragua – which finished first – its only loss. But their fateful game is an analyst’s nightmare, exemplifying Tartakover’s famous saying that the winner in chess can be defined as the one who makes “the penultimate mistake”.

If Duda-Giri were a sitcom, this Sicilian Scheveningen feels like one of those “Rocky” movies where the two fighters land on the canvas three or four times before a righteous haymaker ultimately decides the fight.

The game quickly becomes totally irrational and players don’t have the luxury of time and powerful chess engines to guide them. A brief summary of the start of the game: Adewumi gets a nearly won game after 18. Qe2? (h6 g6 19. Rh3 is good for Paragua) Rxb2! (Kxb2?? Bxa3+ leads to mate), only to fumble with 20…Bxa3? (Rb6! 21. Qxd5 Qxa3+ 22. Kd2 Rd6 23. Qc4 Nb6 is very strong), only for White to return fumble with 22. Qxd5?? (Re3 holds the balance), only to commit another turnover with 23. Qc4 Qd6? (Nb6! 24. Bxb6 Qxb6 25. Bd3 Kf8! 26. Rhe1 Rd7, with the advantage) 24. g6!, and suddenly White wins again.

Three consecutive moves define the crazy course of the game: 28. Rdg1?? (the winner is missing 28. Qh4 ! 44. Bxh1 29. Rxh1 Rf6 30. Qh8+ Kf7 31. Rg1) Qf6 ?? (missing the equalization 28…Ne5) 29. Rh6!, and again the computers give White a decisive advantage.

Wait, there’s more: Amid the chaos, Paragua fails to find the mortal 33. Bf6!!, who wins immediately after 33…Nxf6 34. Rxg7+ Kh8 (Kf8 35. Qxf7 mate) 35. Qh2+, and throws a second win with 35. Rd3?? (Kd1!, believe it or not, seems to be the right path, in lines such as 35…Bd3+ 36. Ke1 Qxc3+ 37. Bd2 Qe5+ 38. Qxe5 Nxe5 39. Rxg7+ Kf8 40. Bxf7). Adewumi in turn does not find the crazy equalizing line 35…Be4+! 36. Kd4 Bc5+ 37. Qxc5 Nxc5 38. Rxg7+ Kxg7 39. Bc1+ Qg2 40. Rxg2+ Bxg2 41. Bxf7 Kxf7 42. Rxc5 with a probable draw.

White wins again after 35…Nc5+? 36. Kd4!, but again missed the volley back to 38. Qc4 Qc2?? (Qxc4+ 39. Kxc4 Rc7+ 40. Kb3 Bf8 offers some chance of survival) 39. Kxg7+!! Rxg7, when the point is there again for the capture on 40. Bh6+! Kxh6 (Kf6 41. Nd5+ Bxd5 42. Qxc2) 41. Qe6+ Kh5 42. Qxf7+ Kh4 43. Qh7 mate. Instead, on 40. Bf6+?? Kf8 White’s attack suddenly disappears, this time for good. After 41. Bg5 Kd7+ 42. Ke5 Qh2+ 43. Bf4 Qxg1 44. Bh6+ Ke8, all control squares are covered and Black’s material advantage is overwhelming; Paraguay resigned.

What should we learn from a game like this? Your guess is as good as mine.

Duda-Giri, Meltwater Online Champions Chess Tour Finals, November 2022

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bg5 Nbd7 7. Rc1 h6 8. Bh4 g5 9. Bg3 Ne4 10. Qb3 Bxc3+ 11. bxc3 Nb6 12. e3 h5 13. c4 h4 14. Be5 f6 15. cxd5 fxe5 16. Bb5+ Kf8 17. Nxe5 Kg7 18. Bd3 Nd6 19. OO g4 20. f4 Rf8 21. e4 g3 22. f5 Qg5 23. Rxc7+ Kg8 24. Bb1 Qd2 25. Qf3 Bxf5 26. exf5 Qxd4+ 27. Kh1 Rac8 28. Rg7+ Kxg7 29. f6+ Kh6 30. Ng4+ Kg5 31. Qf5+ Nxf5 32. Rxf5+ Kg6 33. Re5+ Black resigns.

Paragua-Adewumi, GMB Tournament, New York GM/IM Fall Invitational, New York, November 2022

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be3 a6 7. a3 Nf6 8. f4 d6 9. Qf3 Be7 10. OOO OO 11. Nxc6 bxc6 12. g4 Kb8 13. g5 Nd7 14. h4 d5 15. h5 Qa5 16. Bf2 f5 17. exd5 cxd5 18. Qe2 Rxb2 19. Qxe6+ Rf7 20. Bd4 Bxa3 21. Kd2 Qb4 22. Qxd5 Bb7 23. Qc4 Qd6 24. g6 hxg6 25. hxg6 Qxf 26. Be3 Qd6+ 27. Bd3 Qxg6 28. Rdg1 Qf6 29. Kh6 Qe7 30. Khg6 Kf8 31. Bg5 Qb4 32. Qc7 Kg8 33. Bc4 Kxc2+ 34. Kxc2 Qb2+ 35. Kd3 Nc5+ 36. Kd4 Nb3+ 37. Bc4 Q2c Qx 39. Rxg7+ Kxg7 40. Bf6+ Kf8 41. Bg5 Rd7+ 42. Ke5 Qh2+ 43. Bf4 Qxg1 44. Bh6+ Ke8 White resigns.

• David R. Sands can be reached at 202/636-3178 or by email at dsands@washingtontimes.com.

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Young FM prodigies Tani Adewumi and IM Yagiz Erdogmus face off https://tromsosjakklubb.com/young-fm-prodigies-tani-adewumi-and-im-yagiz-erdogmus-face-off/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 19:04:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/young-fm-prodigies-tani-adewumi-and-im-yagiz-erdogmus-face-off/ FM Tani Adewumi should play against other young IM chess sensations Yagiz Erdogmus at 7:00 a.m. Pacific Time/4:00 p.m. Central European Time, November 20 in the next episode of his regular ChessKid series “Tani vs The World”. Erdogmus is an 11-year-old IM from Turkey who recently won the 2022 ChessKid Youth Speed ​​Chess Championship in […]]]>

FM Tani Adewumi should play against other young IM chess sensations Yagiz Erdogmus at 7:00 a.m. Pacific Time/4:00 p.m. Central European Time, November 20 in the next episode of his regular ChessKid series “Tani vs The World”.

Erdogmus is an 11-year-old IM from Turkey who recently won the 2022 ChessKid Youth Speed ​​Chess Championship in convincing fashion, beating CM Ilan Schnaider 10-4 in the final. He is also the highest rated player in the world aged 12 and under (2453).

Adewumi’s goal is to become the world’s youngest GM, and he’s had a remarkable journey to become a chess master.

He recently achieved his third IM standard last weekend (after reaching his second in July this year), but still needs to win one more than one Swiss and reach 2400 to receive the title. After this recent event, he is now among the top 12 in the world for 12 and under.

The match between these two talented young players will be broadcast on Chess.com/TV, twitch.tv/chesskidand youtube.com/chesskidofficial.

“Tani vs. the World” is an ongoing series of practice matches in which Adewumi plays titled opponents. Invited opponents so far include IM Justus Williams, IM Kostya Kavutskiy and GM Jesse Kraai.

Hosting and commentary will be provided by FM mike klein (FunMasterMike) and Nigarhan Gurpinar (also known as Naycir on Twitch).


Be sure to tune in at 7:00 a.m. PT/4:00 p.m. CEE on November 20! You can follow the event on Chess.com/TV, twitch.tv/chesskidand youtube.com/chesskidofficial.

]]> Chess on a houseboat in Kerala https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-on-a-houseboat-in-kerala/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 08:55:13 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-on-a-houseboat-in-kerala/ By IM V. Saravanan Chess Houseboat is back The highly anticipated Chess Houseboat event returns to the exotic state of Kerala, a tourist country in southern India, after the inaugural event in 2020. The second edition of the event is scheduled from 22n/a at 28e January 2023, with a total cash prize fund of 2300 […]]]>

By IM V. Saravanan

Chess Houseboat is back

The highly anticipated Chess Houseboat event returns to the exotic state of Kerala, a tourist country in southern India, after the inaugural event in 2020. The second edition of the event is scheduled from 22n/a at 28e January 2023, with a total cash prize fund of 2300 euros with a first prize of 500 euros, and an additional 1700 euros in material prizes and trophies. It will include a nine-round rapid chess tournament spread over five days with a time control of G20+5 and a one-day Blitz tournament.

Tournament flyer

Aimed at showcasing the state’s natural beauty, rich cultural heritage and traditional cuisine of the land, the event has the potential to attract primarily foreign visitors and is supported by the Kerala Tourism the official department of state government.

Tournament Logo

This tournament was inspired by the Chess train tournament launched in 2013 over several years covering the Czech Republic and neighboring European countries. The architect of the event, Pavel Matocha participated in the previous edition of the Chess Houseboat event in 2020, and also led a Charity Simulcast by Managing Director David Navara in Prague to support the vaccination campaign in the state of Kerala at the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, which saw the then Prime Minister of the Czech Republic Andrej Babis himself as one of the participants .

Chess Houseboat 2023 is run by Orient Chess Moves led by Correspondence IM NR Anilkumar, who participated in Chess Train 2019 and was inspired to create the Chess Houseboat concept.


NR Anil Kumar as a participant in Chess Train 2019 | Photo: Prague Chess Society

The unique attraction of the event will be the location of the tournament venues: a floating barge named Emperor Vembanadu on the famous backwaters of Vembanad, a lakeside jungle resort Tiger Reserve Forest on an island in Thekkady, and a resort among a group of small islands next to a vast bird sanctuary in Kumarakom, a famous tourist spot in the state.


A floating houseboat in the backwaters of Vembanadu, the tournament venue for the first two days | Photo: Orient Chess Moves


Interior of Emperor Vembanadu | Photo: Orient Chess Moves

Attendees will be attracted by the various unique resorts where attendees can stay during the event. The first two days, visitors will enjoy the waterfront Abad Turtle Beach Resort with its uniqueness vibe in the white sand of Marari Beachone of the top five hammock beaches in the world.

The beautiful white sand beach of Marari | Photo: Orient Chess Moves

The other attractive place to stay will be the Bolgatty Palace on the island of Bolgatty, a sumptuous mansion built by the Dutch in the 18e century, transformed into a seaside resort.


The majestic Bolgatty Palace Resort | Photo: Kerala Tourism Development Corporation

For the day of the stay, participants would have the opportunity to visit ‘Aranya Nivas‘, a jungle lodge by a lake inside Periyar Wildlife Reserve, a tiger reserve famous for being a habitat for elephant, sambar deer, barking deer, wild boar, tiger, leopard and bear – for the sake of these wild visitors the gates to the lodge are closed in the evening every day. While in Thekkady, participants will travel through exotic greenery accessible only by boat for their rounds to lake palacea former summer palace of the Travancore kings which is now a resort.


The Aranya Nivas Jungle Lodge | Photo: Kerala Tourism Development Corporation


The Lake Palace, majesty turned into hospitality | Photo: Orient Chess Moves

Throughout the event, the cultural and artistic heritage of Kerala will be showcased through exclusive performances in the traditional arts of the state exclusively for the participants. During the evenings there are performances in demonstrations of Kalaripayattu – a thousand year old form of martial arts – and other Kerala arts.


Kalaripayattu, an ancient form of martial arts from Kerala | Photo: Kerala Tourism Development Corporation

One of the attractions of the 2020 was the elaborate spread of delicious Kerala cuisine in the barges themselves immediately after the end of each tournament session, which was praised by the participants. Highlighting local culinary delights will also be one of the important objectives of the event.


Lunch at the barge | Photo: Orient Chess Moves

I will be giving a lecture on chess at one of the evenings and was rewarded with a typical caricature as an announcement poster, by one of the renowned artists, designers and sculptors of Kerala, Nandan Pillai.

Announcement of a chess lecture by IM V.Saravanan during the event. Caricature by artist Nandan Pillai

The package fee for the whole event for participants will be 950 euros, while it will be 900 euros for companions, while discounts have been offered for some categories of visitors. Fees include entire stay, food, airport pickup and drop-off, travel, sightseeing tickets, and cultural performances.

A detailed itinerary and other information is available on the official website: http://www.chesshouseboat.org/. Registration for foreign participants is open until 15e November 2022.

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IM Nolte Wins 2022 IIEE National Chess Olympiad https://tromsosjakklubb.com/im-nolte-wins-2022-iiee-national-chess-olympiad/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 21:18:23 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/im-nolte-wins-2022-iiee-national-chess-olympiad/ IM Nolte Wins 2022 IIEE National Chess Olympiad By Marlon BernardinPhilBoxing.comSat 12 Nov 2022 MANILA — INTERNATIONAL Master (IM) Rolando Nolte cemented his position as one of the top chess players in the Philippines when he led the Institute of Integrated Electrical Engineers of the Philippines Inc.-IIEE National Chess Olympiad 2022 at Music Hall, SM […]]]>

IM Nolte Wins 2022 IIEE National Chess Olympiad

By Marlon Bernardin
PhilBoxing.com
Sat 12 Nov 2022

MANILA — INTERNATIONAL Master (IM) Rolando Nolte cemented his position as one of the top chess players in the Philippines when he led the Institute of Integrated Electrical Engineers of the Philippines Inc.-IIEE National Chess Olympiad 2022 at Music Hall, SM Mall of Asia, Pasay City on Thursday.

Nolte shared the point with international master Barlo Nadera in the final round to score 6.0 points in seven outings to claim the top prize of P5,000.

Nadera (lower tie break points) came in second with a similar 6.0 points and received the second prize of P3,000.

Fide Master Alekhine Fabiosa Nouri defeated Candidate Master Genghis Katipunan Imperial in the final round to settle for third place with 5.5 points and went home with P2,000 for his effort.

International Master Chito Garma tied with Arena Grandmaster Kimuel Aaron Lorenzo to score 5.5 points and won the Top Senior award for P1,000.

Lorenzo finished fourth to bring home P1,000.

International master Ronald Banco overpowered Mark James Marcellana and finished fifth for P1,000.

The category winners were Rolando Gangozo, (Top III, 1st place, P5,000), National Master Robert Arellano, (Top III, 2nd place, P3,000), Paul Julian Querubin, (Top III, 3rd place, P2,000 ), Vince Duane Pascual (Top Youth, P1,000) and Female National Mistress Antonella Tonelle “Berthe” Racasa (Top Dame, P1,000).

Earlier, Mr. Ramon Fernandez and Mr. Red Dumuk conducted the opening rites. The tournament director was Eng. Allan Anthony P. Alvarez.-Marlon Bernardino-

Click here to see a list of other articles written by Marlon Bernardino.


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    Checkmate: Interviews with the local library chess club by Elaha Moosa, Gumley House School https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-interviews-with-the-local-library-chess-club-by-elaha-moosa-gumley-house-school/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 21:15:16 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/checkmate-interviews-with-the-local-library-chess-club-by-elaha-moosa-gumley-house-school/ Simon Williams (a grandmaster) once said “The beauty of chess is that it can be whatever you want it to be. It transcends language, age, race, religion, politics, gender and socioeconomic background. No matter what your circumstances, anyone can enjoy a good fight to the death on the chessboard. I saw this quote come to […]]]>

    Simon Williams (a grandmaster) once said “The beauty of chess is that it can be whatever you want it to be. It transcends language, age, race, religion, politics, gender and socioeconomic background. No matter what your circumstances, anyone can enjoy a good fight to the death on the chessboard. I saw this quote come to life in Central’s weekly chess club Ealing Library.Taking place from 1.30-3.30pm every Sunday, I had planned to visit after seeing the poster hanging on the library wall: a chance to explore this 1500 year old board game.

    When I arrived, I was greeted by a multitude of chessboards and tables, all eager to watch a checkmate. However, while I waited for what I thought was the average chess club attendee – a wise old grandmaster – I was instead greeted by mother Enshul and her five-year-old son. His son was quick to mount a chessboard and fiercely challenge another young chess player. I marveled at the sight of two combatants in the joyful war called chess, especially at such a young age. This pleasant surprise made me curious to learn more about Enshul and his son’s journey with chess. When asked what she thinks is the most interesting thing about chess, Enshul replied that “it’s good, no language barrier, no age barrier, two people focusing on the game, no matter who is sitting in front”. His answer proved true as I watched children continue to play, strangers and yet communicate happily through chess as if it were a language! My intrigue grew as Enshul told me that she, her husband and son had recently moved to the UK from India and that her son had “adjusted well” – clearly carrying his chess skills over 4000 miles, ringing true to how universal chess is. Language.

    Alongside Enshul and his son, I met a father and his 8-year-old son, Riyan, another avid young chess player. He started by playing with his father, racing against time as he calculated his next move. When I inquired about Riyan’s beginnings in chess, I found out that he started 3 years ago, when he was 5, just because they “had him at home”. Playing chess started out as a ‘weekend activity’ for Riyan but ‘he got good at it and I started liking it’,

    Having frequented the club, I had my eyes opened to the range of chess players and that chess can be more than just a game, even for those as young as 5! I found that attending the club gave me a new perspective on chess, a game that I once thought was complicated and only for geniuses. However, as Simon Williams said, chess can “transcend language, race, religion, politics, gender and socio-economic background”. – a feat for what it is. It is obvious that our misconceptions about “difficult” activities, such as chess, can prevent us from finding a potential passion; instead, we should release worries and just be open to learning and exploring – just like Riyan and Enshul’s son.

    Thanks to Central Ealing Library for hosting this amazingly insightful chess club and to everyone who enlightened me in this interview!

    ]]>
    No place for cheating in the beautiful sport of chess https://tromsosjakklubb.com/no-place-for-cheating-in-the-beautiful-sport-of-chess/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 13:56:56 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/no-place-for-cheating-in-the-beautiful-sport-of-chess/ World Chess Champion GM Magnus Carlsen recently accused a young grandmaster (GM) Hans Niemann of cheating after losing to him in the 2022 Sinquefield Cup. It is one of the most prestigious tournaments on the world chess calendar and it is played on the board, in St. Louis, Missouri, USA at the Saint Louis Chess […]]]>

    World Chess Champion GM Magnus Carlsen recently accused a young grandmaster (GM) Hans Niemann of cheating after losing to him in the 2022 Sinquefield Cup.

    It is one of the most prestigious tournaments on the world chess calendar and it is played on the board, in St. Louis, Missouri, USA at the Saint Louis Chess Club.

    In a later event shortly after, Carlsen quit after a move to Niemann in an online game. GM Carlsen took things a step further by stating that he will not be playing against GM Niemann in the future.

    – Advertising –

    FIDE, the chess governing body, chastised the world champion for stepping down after a blow and said: “We strongly believe there are better ways to handle this situation.” Additionally, a FIDE investigation has been launched regarding the cheating allegations against GM Niemann.

    FIDE added: “It is our duty to protect the integrity of the game and its image, and given the escalation of the incident, we believe it is necessary to take a step forward.”

    FIDE announced that it was “ready to task its Fair Play Commission with a full investigation into the incident, when adequate initial evidence is provided and all parties involved disclose the information available to them”.

    Cheating allegations have existed in chess for some time, as in other sports. Currently, allegations of cheating affect several sports including fishing and poker. Until recently, the main form of cheating in chess was collusion. However, with the improvements in technology and especially in artificial intelligence, chess computers or chess engines are now widely used by players, between matches, to analyze games for the best moves in various positions. Cheating can now take place through the use of electronic devices, linked to chess engines.

    The FIDE Fair Play Committee has updated the definition of cheating to include the deliberate use of electronic devices or other sources of information or advice during a match.

    To minimize the risk of cheating in chess, several measures have been taken for online and over the board tournaments. With this new investigation, FIDE will surely come up with new guidelines to ensure the integrity of sport.

    Since the founding of the Jamaica Chess Federation (JCF) in 1969, the organization has been a source of strength, founded on values ​​that have made the Jamaica Chess Federation one of the most trusted brands in the sport in Jamaica.

    As the JCF operates in a world of complexities and global challenges, its values ​​are even more important today. The Jamaica Chess Federation believes in winning with determination and integrity in chess.

    The new administration follows FIDE guidelines and uses these guidelines to organize chess tournaments. Additionally, there are chess arbiters and Fair Play individuals to monitor game performance. Players found guilty of cheating, after proper investigation, are suspended or may have their membership revoked in accordance with JCF regulations.

    The Jamaica Chess Federation puts players first and believes in fair play. She is very proud that one of her juniors, Wolmerian Jaden Shaw, 15, Jamaica Absolute Junior Champion (U20) and FIDE Candidate Master (CM) won the Svetozar. Gligoric Fair Play Award at the recent 44th World Chess Olympiad in Chennai, India. His opponent Grandmaster Meelis Kanep fell ill during Jamaica’s game against Estonia and was unable to complete the match. Jaden, who made his Chess Olympiad debut, accepted a draw when he could have insisted on a historic victory. His act of generosity was hailed by all, including the President of FIDE and the Chief Minister of Chennai. Past winners of this award include none other than GM World Champion Magnus Carlsen. Former JCF President and member of the FIDE Constitutional Commission, Ian Wilkinson, KC, said: “Jaden’s display of sportsmanship is a true example of all that sportsmanship, not cheating, is the way to go.”

    The juniors are one of the main reasons for Jamaica’s success over the past 53 years. To continue to build a strong JCF, it must continually invest not only in its players, but also in its administrators, which includes investing in their integrity. As FIDE said, “We hope that this whole situation could have a long-term positive effect, if handled properly.”

    The next international event for Jamaica is the Central American and Caribbean (CAC) Youth Chess Championship, in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, from November 19-26, 2022.

    Jamaica foresees the participation of juniors in the age groups: U8, U10, U12, U14, U16 and U18, and works diligently with potential partners and sponsors to obtain support. There is a strong correlation between performance in chess and standard school tests. Players continue to excel both at chess and academically. As an example, one of the top female juniors, female candidate master (WCM) Raehanna Brown of Campion College received nine ones with straight A profiles in recent CSEC (CXC) exams. Also, another junior player, Kyle Pratt of Campion College, a top regional math specialist, has recently started attending one of the best academic institutions in the world, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The Jamaica Chess Federation will continue to lead and partner with FIDE, to do everything possible to eradicate all forms of cheating in chess, thereby ensuring the integrity of the sport and enabling players, especially juniors, to continue to excel locally and internationally.

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    Fall of the world champions: Nakamura and Nepomniachtchi progress to the final https://tromsosjakklubb.com/fall-of-the-world-champions-nakamura-and-nepomniachtchi-progress-to-the-final/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 14:49:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/fall-of-the-world-champions-nakamura-and-nepomniachtchi-progress-to-the-final/ GM Ian Nepomniachtchi and Hikaru Nakamura were confirmed as grand finalists for the 2022 Fischer Random World Championships on Saturday after winning their respective semi-finals by convincing margins. Nakamura needed just three games to book his spot after dispatching the fast-paced world champion GM Nodirbek Abdusattorov 3-0, while Nepomniachtchi was equally impressive against GM Magnus […]]]>

    GM Ian Nepomniachtchi and Hikaru Nakamura were confirmed as grand finalists for the 2022 Fischer Random World Championships on Saturday after winning their respective semi-finals by convincing margins.

    Nakamura needed just three games to book his spot after dispatching the fast-paced world champion GM Nodirbek Abdusattorov 3-0, while Nepomniachtchi was equally impressive against GM Magnus Carlsen after losing the opener, bouncing back to win their game 3-1.

    The Fischer Random World Championship Finals will take place on October 30 at 8:00 a.m. PT / 4:00 p.m. CEST.

    Four deserving semi-finalists seemed impossible to separate on paper. However, the position randomizer did its best to dump players with a weirdly asymmetrical position selected for the first round of the day. Interestingly, the starting position only showed an advantage of 0.27 for white, slightly less than in a normal chess game.

    The queenside was always going to be a target in such a setup and Nakamura did his best to distract Abdusattorov with a wild kingside rook raise on move three. Despite the diversion, the Uzbek GM was able to catch Nakamura’s a-pawn with his queen and take a significant advantage. He relaxed a little too soon, however, and Nakamura pounced, trapping his queen and forcing an unfavorable exchange that cost him the game.

    Carlsen finished what Abdusattorov couldn’t and decimated Nepomniachtchi’s queen wing with a perfectly timed bishop’s sacrifice. As if offering the bishop wasn’t enough, Carlsen then offered an additional exchange sacrifice to rub salt in his opponent’s wounds. The match was not perfect and Carlsen had to prove himself late in the game, following fierce resistance from Nepomyachtchi. The world champion finally managed to take the lead.

    After an unbeaten streak in the group stage, Abdusattorov looked the least likely to go down without a serious fight, but Nakamura was simply unstoppable on Saturday when the pressure came. The American blitzer’s second game was the most engrossing of the day and he led from start to finish, climbing to 2-0.

    Seeking to join his longtime rival on the 2/2 in his own semi-final match, Carlsen appeared to be on course for a second win before several unusual errors turned the script around. 41. Carlsen’s Kd2? was the worst of them and proved decisive, leaving the recurve world champion with his head in his hands.

    The third round saw the introduction of another unusual starting position where the player’s knights started on squares a1 and h1.

    In an unavoidable situation, Abdusattorov opted for a big cross setup against Nakamura and showed promising signs of a resurgence when he swapped queens and established two passed pawns on c and d files. The key moment of the game came when Abdusattorov had the opportunity to create a third passed pawn on move 21, but he missed his chance and Nakamura quickly reversed the situation.

    It almost seemed like Nakamura was in a hurry on Saturday and now we understand why: he had to return to his hotel to film his recap of the day’s game for Youtube, which he uploaded just an hour or two after the end of the matches. His analysis of his three matches is well worth the detour!

    A 3-0 scoreline doesn’t do justice to the strength Abdusattorov has shown in this tournament and it’s easy to imagine the 18-year-old will be a favorite for this title and others in the years to come.

    Nakamura’s early round lift gave Abdusattorov plenty to think about. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

    Meanwhile, a crucial match was being played out between Carlsen and Nepomniachtchi who were struggling in a third home and away game. Nepomniachtchi fought for the initiative from the start and was eventually rewarded for his efforts, winning in just 28 moves.

    One of the questions I sometimes hear about Fischer Random is whether there could be an initial position where white’s advantage is much greater than in a normal game. I don’t know how to answer this question scientifically, but I suspect that in this position there really is a greater advantage than usual, especially since Black cannot maintain symmetry, as we will see. In any case, the fact that Carlsen is still losing with the white pieces is an indication that this shouldn’t be a big deal.

    If there’s one player you’d tip to win on demand with black, it would of course be Carlsen. From the first move, the Norwegian world champion showed his intention to create imbalance and asymmetry and after seven moves each, Carlsen had only moved pawns! The strategy certainly paid off and Carlsen started looking for tricks and traps that would bother Nepomniachtchi, but no water could be wrung from that stone on Saturday.

    Carlsen definitely had the means to draw, but given that only a win would take him forward, he pressed and eventually over-pressed, which gave Nepomniachtchi a 3-1 margin.

    Nepomniachtchi ponders his next move against a formidable foe. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

    With both finalists having played confidence matches on Saturday, a high-octane showdown is expected in Sunday’s final between Nakamura and Nepomniachtchi. One of these players will be crowned the new Fischer Random World Champion, so tune in to find out who will win.

    Knockout bracket

    The Fischer Random World Championship, presented by the Government of Iceland and the City of Reykjavik, brings together the best players from around the world to compete in a series of classic Fischer Random games for their share of the $400,000 prize and the title of FIDE Fischer Random World Champion. Fischer Random (also known as Chess960) is a chess variant where all the standard chess rules are the same except for the starting position of the pieces, which can be in any of 960 semi-random configurations. Strongly endorsed by GM 11th World Champion Bobby Fischer, the variant eschews opening preparation to highlight players’ true understanding of chess.


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    Crossville Celebrates National Chess Day, Remembers Susan E. Kantor With Tournament | local sports https://tromsosjakklubb.com/crossville-celebrates-national-chess-day-remembers-susan-e-kantor-with-tournament-local-sports/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 19:18:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/crossville-celebrates-national-chess-day-remembers-susan-e-kantor-with-tournament-local-sports/ What is National Chess Day and who is Susan E. Kantor? In 1976, by presidential proclamation, former President Gerald Ford declared October 9 as National Chess Day: a day to celebrate the royal game. National Chess Day is held every second Saturday in October. Since then, the Cumberland County Chess Club holds its annual Fall […]]]>

    What is National Chess Day and who is Susan E. Kantor?

    In 1976, by presidential proclamation, former President Gerald Ford declared October 9 as National Chess Day: a day to celebrate the royal game. National Chess Day is held every second Saturday in October.

    Since then, the Cumberland County Chess Club holds its annual Fall Open on this day.

    In 2020, the chess club lost its longtime president, Susan E. Kantor. Kantor, who along with the late Harry D. Sabine essentially ran the chess club and other chess events in the county.

    She very rarely, if ever, missed a Thursday night meeting at the club.

    Because she was a special person and a friend to all, the Chess Club decided to rename the annual Fall Open as the Susan E. Kantor National Chess Day Fall Open in her honor.

    On Saturday, October 8, the second annual release was held at the Cumberland County Community Complex. There were three sections with 53 players in all.

    In the Open section, Peter Bereolos of Knoxville took first place by winning all of his matches. Tied for second and third are Tsotne Kvelashvili and Franklin Zhang, both of Knoxville.

    There were also winners in different classes based on player ratings: Coty Phillips, Crossville, won the top ‘A’ award; Eric Zhao, Knoxville, won the top “B” award; Bochen Jiang, Knoxville, and Dannie Kennedy, Cookeville, shared the top “C” award; and Carter Pattison, Johnson City, received the top “D” award.

    The amateur section was won by Mengdie Hu, Johnson City. Hu, like Bereolos at the Open, has won all of his amateur matches. Adam Thomas Daniel, Knoxville, followed behind for second place. Nolan Humphrey and Elsa He, both of Knoxville, tied for third place and shared the first “E” and “F” prizes; and Juliette Pattison, Johnson City. The first “G” award was won by Thanya Nguyen of Kingston Springs; and Luke Wiley, Crossville. Rounding out the awards, Dean Ellorando, Knoxville, won the top “Unranked” award. Close behind were Elijah Roberts, Knoxville, and Jeff Woodside, Cookeville, tied for second “Unrated”.

    The Novice section was won by Connor York, Cookeville. Tied for second-fourth place were Lonzell Blackwell Jr., Munford; Peyson Cydrus, Crossville; and William Doan, Cooke-

    town. The amateur section was completed by Griffy Armstrong, Crossville.

    Two club prizes were offered to the clubs that brought in the most players.

    The first win was the University of Tennessee at Knoxville who brought 10 players. Tied for second place in the club, Martin Elementary, Crossville and Hardin Valley Middle.

    Everyone received a Susan E. Kantor Memorial Pen and four lucky winners won Susan E. Kantor Memorial Cups.

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    ‘Pune Prisoners’ win bronze for India at Intercontinental Online Chess Championship https://tromsosjakklubb.com/pune-prisoners-win-bronze-for-india-at-intercontinental-online-chess-championship/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 09:16:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/pune-prisoners-win-bronze-for-india-at-intercontinental-online-chess-championship/ Chenai: After the two bronze medals at Chess Olympiad 2022, Indian chess players have won another bronze medal in an international chess tournament. What is unique this time around is that the players were prisoners housed in Yerawada Central Jail, Pune, and the event was the Intercontinental Online Chess Championship. The Indian team defeated El […]]]>

    Chenai: After the two bronze medals at Chess Olympiad 2022, Indian chess players have won another bronze medal in an international chess tournament.

    What is unique this time around is that the players were prisoners housed in Yerawada Central Jail, Pune, and the event was the Intercontinental Online Chess Championship.

    The Indian team defeated El Salvador and won the bronze medal. Gold was won by the Philippines and silver by Colombia.

    The tournament was organized by the International Chess Federation (FIDE) and the Cook County Sheriff’s Office (Chicago, Illinois, USA) and coincided with International Prison Education Day.

    “Many prisoner chess players are strong enough to be assessed. Some can turn into chess coach for beginners,” Grandmaster Abhijit Kunte, an employee of the Indian Oil Corporation (IOC), told the IANS.

    Around 85 teams from 46 countries took part in the tournament, which could also be called the “Chess Olympiad for Prisoners”.

    According to Kunte, there was a selection event in India among prisoners from different prisons. In the men’s section, prisoners from Pune came first and the team from Prayagraj prison came second. In the female and juvenile (juvenile) sections, the teams were from Delhi.

    Prayagraj Prison Chess Team played in the early rounds.

    Kunte is the ‘Chess in Prisons’ program coordinator of the IOC’s Parivarthan – Prison to Pride programme.

    “The IOC launched the program on 15.8.2021 whereby prisoners from different prisons were trained in games that interested them. This was done so that the prisoners could have some positivity in their minds,” said Bhalchandra Joglekar, Deputy General Manager, Employee Services and Sports.

    Interestingly, Joglekar is a former Ranji Trophy player for Maharashtra. “We launched the prison chess program in 2021. In 37 prisons the game was taught. Over the past three months, several top players have coached the prisoners in different prisons,” Kunte said.

    Talking about his experience teaching chess in prisons, Kunte said inmates have a lot of free time and chess helps keep their minds busy. “Many prisoners told me that at night, lying on their bed, they were thinking about the games/movements they had played and how they would play the next day,” Kunte said.

    “Many prisoners had played the game earlier and knew how the pieces moved. Some of them have good endgame knowledge,” Kunte added.

    “Pune prison authorities were also helpful. They wanted the inmates to win a medal for the country and provided the necessary aid. It was a team effort,” Kunte said.

    According to Joglekar, players were first trained with a traditional chess board and later they were given computers with an internet connection to practice chess online, Joglekar said. “The Yerawada chess team members were very excited to win their games. It is very difficult to describe their joy in words after winning the finals,” Joglekar said.

    “The pride of representing the nation in an international tournament and bringing a medal to the country was very evident but cannot be described,” added Joglekar.

    He said the last game was on September 17 and that was the day the prisoners met their family members. But after 5 p.m., no family gatherings would be allowed. “However, chess games were played in the evening. The prison authorities were considerate and allowed the chess players to meet their family members after their game was over. Players were able to share the good news with their family members,” Joglekar said.

    “I would like to congratulate all the participants, all the teams and everyone who got involved. I hope you enjoyed playing, representing your countries and, above all, that you improved your skills by learning and playing chess and communicating with other people. We all hope that at some point in your life you will be free to make your own choices, and chess will help you make those choices rationally,” said FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich.

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    A chess tournament pays tribute to the life and passion of Daniel Perelman for chess https://tromsosjakklubb.com/a-chess-tournament-pays-tribute-to-the-life-and-passion-of-daniel-perelman-for-chess/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 21:34:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/a-chess-tournament-pays-tribute-to-the-life-and-passion-of-daniel-perelman-for-chess/ BROOKFIELD, Wis. (CBS 58) – The community of Brookfield continues to remember 18-year-old Daniel Perelman, who died in a plane crash last May during one of his first solo flights. On Saturday, October 15, he is not only remembered as a young man with a bright future, studying to become a surgeon at Northwestern. He […]]]>

    BROOKFIELD, Wis. (CBS 58) – The community of Brookfield continues to remember 18-year-old Daniel Perelman, who died in a plane crash last May during one of his first solo flights.

    On Saturday, October 15, he is not only remembered as a young man with a bright future, studying to become a surgeon at Northwestern.

    He is remembered with a chess tournament, something his family and friends say was one of his greatest passions.

    “Chess was a big part of his life and a big part of what made him who he is,” said Benny Perelman, Daniel’s father.

    Benny said that by the time Daniel was 10, he had no chance in a chess match against Daniel.

    On Saturday, hundreds of people came out for the first annual Daniel Perelman Memorial Wisconsin Rapid State Championship.

    Benny says that while Daniel was an accomplished chess player, there was more to it.

    “More important than a trophy or a title here and there, it helped, like I said, to make him who he is, to build his character,” Benny said.

    He said that’s what he hopes people of all ages who come out can learn from the tournament.

    “Learn to lose with grace, learn to approach someone you just beat or lost,” Benny said.

    Power of Pawns founder and event organizer Krish Sharma can be seen in photos next to Daniel when they were young boys.

    “Me and Daniel, we go back,” Sharma said, adding that everything changed after Daniel died in the crash. “It completely turned my world upside down.”

    Now he is working with friends and family Perelman and Daniels to continue his legacy.

    “They all know he was not just a great chess player, he was a chess enthusiast,” Sharma said.

    Many people present on Saturday played with Daniel.

    “Everyone knows he really had an impact on the chess community,” Sharma said.

    Sharma says he hopes Daniel’s kindness and love for others will be remembered.

    “He was passionate about the people around him, he was a really good soul and I think as I got older I really got to see that side of him,” Sharma said.

    “We hope they can kind of learn a lesson from who he was as a person,” Benny said, “to learn more about Daniel and his story, but also about the game of chess.”

    Benny says the presentation of Brookfield Academy, Daniel’s alma mater and the chess community is touching for them.

    “We are constantly, continuously surprised and overwhelmed by the response from the community,” Benny said.

    Daniel’s sister, Lola, says for those who knew him, it shouldn’t be surprising how many people came out to show their love.

    “I’m not very surprised, just because I know so many people loved him and all that, so I’m really, really happy,” Lola said.

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