Chess – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 20:39:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-16.png Chess – Tromso Sjakklubb http://tromsosjakklubb.com/ 32 32 DVIDS – News – Moving On: Army recruiter aims for chess glory https://tromsosjakklubb.com/dvids-news-moving-on-army-recruiter-aims-for-chess-glory/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 20:39:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/dvids-news-moving-on-army-recruiter-aims-for-chess-glory/ QUEEN CREEK, Ariz. — It’s an obsession that started at a young age for the master sergeant. Derick Arellano – the art of chess and strategy, something he developed to perfection in his lifetime. This level of performance allowed Arellano to become one of the highest ranked chess players in the United States Army. Arellano […]]]>

QUEEN CREEK, Ariz. — It’s an obsession that started at a young age for the master sergeant. Derick Arellano – the art of chess and strategy, something he developed to perfection in his lifetime.

This level of performance allowed Arellano to become one of the highest ranked chess players in the United States Army.

Arellano plans to compete in the upcoming 63rd Annual United States Armed Forces Championship at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, NJ, in October and cement his status as the best.

Getting to this point has not been an easy task.

Arellano, Station Commander, Queen Creek Recruiting Station, Tempe Recruiting Company, Phoenix Recruiting Battalion, was born in Vail, Colorado before his family moved to the small rural community of Penasco, NM

It was there that Arellano learned the art of chess, his father teaching him the basics and preparing him for further success.

“I started chess at the age of seven, that’s when I learned how the pieces worked and some beginner strategies from my father,” Arellano said. “After learning how to play and the objective of the game, I wanted to win against anyone and everyone I played against.”

“My first victory came when I made a bet against my father; if I won, I had to sleep over at a friend’s house, but if I lost, I had to mow the grass. With so much at stake, I wiped it out and secured my slumber party,” he recalled.

Arellano would compete for Penasco High School, helping them win five consecutive state championships from 2003 to 2007, as he became the team’s focal point after extensive training.

“I had money saved up during my time cleaning and asked my family members if they would help me pay for my lessons, which they agreed. I started contacting grandmasters and international masters from all over the world,” he said. “It took me about a week or two to find the right teacher with the right teaching style to lead me to my goals, but I found it; his name was Goran Vojinovic, an international master from Serbia. He had several students who became national champions under his guidance.

This allowed Arellano to improve his standing on his high school team and lead them to unprecedented success.

“At the age of 12 or 13, I worked my way up to 2nd board from 6th (which meant I was always playing against the 2nd best player in the team),” Arellano explained. “Sitting next to my cousin Andrew who was on board 1, the team coach noticed how easily and often I beat him.”

“Once I took over at 1st board, we were winning state championships and now I was the one teaching the team how to play like champions,” he added.

Arellano frequently participated in Internet games, which also helped to improve his performance.

“I started playing on a website called World Chess Network (WCN). It’s no longer in service, but at the time it was the go-to platform for chess players around the world. I started watching the Grand Masters, International Masters and Fide Masters play,” Arellano explained. “But they were playing one-minute games (ball chess). I was blown away by the speed and accuracy of their play. I started playing chess for several hours every day. By the age of 12, I had played over 100,000 matches.

Over the years, Arellano has participated in several Over the Board (OTB) tournaments, winning in his designated section, but he said that because the United States does not hold as many chess tournaments as Europe, his rating in person has never been higher. as did his note on the internet.

This did not deter Arellano and his chess career continued to flourish, even after he joined the military in 2009 as a paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne Division.

“As a young skydiver, it was hard to find the time to play like before,” Arellano continued. “But my love of the game never went away. I played in a few tournaments in Fort Bragg when I could find the time.

Arellano would eventually find himself on recruiting duty in Corpus Christi, Texas, where he would measure his performance against tough opposition.

“I’ve been in much tougher chess competitions there because Brownsville and Texas A&M are colleges that have masters on their respective teams,” Arellano said. “As a successful recruiter in the San Antonio Battalion, it was hard to find time for failures. But I excelled in recruiting where I finished the battalion’s top 10 recruiting year with 26 enlistments. in 2017.”

Arellano is now determined to prove that he is the best chess player in the various military branches in the next tournament.

“I’m ready to show the world who’s the best in the Armed Forces – that will be me,” Arellano said.







Date taken: 08.03.2022
Date posted: 08.03.2022 16:39
Story ID: 426464
Location: QUEEN CREEK, Arizona, USA






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The World of Chess Streaming – BusinessToday https://tromsosjakklubb.com/the-world-of-chess-streaming-businesstoday/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 11:06:44 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/the-world-of-chess-streaming-businesstoday/ Imagine an oddly shaped but familiar square board game on your mobile screen, only this one adorned with not two but four sets of 16 pieces. Each set is carefully arranged on the four sides of the board, according to its color: red, blue, yellow and green. Next to them is a smaller rectangular box […]]]>

Imagine an oddly shaped but familiar square board game on your mobile screen, only this one adorned with not two but four sets of 16 pieces. Each set is carefully arranged on the four sides of the board, according to its color: red, blue, yellow and green. Next to them is a smaller rectangular box divided into four spaces with as many faces looking out from them. There’s another face hanging in a corner outside the rectangle, frantically checking to see if everything is in order.

What you see in progress is a new age game, OTT avatar of one of the world’s oldest and heaviest sports, chess, played by four players for an audience on YouTube. The four faces watching, the players, are Indian Grandmaster (GM) Vidith Gujrathi with red coins; GM Anish Giri of the Netherlands (blue pieces); FIDE Master and prolific North American YouTube chess streamer Alexandra Botez (yellow); and commentator and chess player Antonio Radic from Croatia, better known by his YouTube nickname, Agadmator, with green pieces.

Finally, there’s commentator and host, stand-up comedian Samay Raina, who kicks off the game with some savvy advice for players to make friends on the chessboard, then betray them or perish. At the start of the game, the live stream is filled with the voices of these high-pitched chess players trying to push and cajole each other to tackle other players’ pieces.

It’s not ‘serious’, in the sense that it’s not a professional tournament. But the live broadcast of chess games now attracts attendees ranging from professional GMs and female GMs to comedians, cricketers and even business personalities. The usually 64-square board – sometimes 160 squares in four-player chess – witnesses several games and tournaments broadcast live and live.

The genesis of chess streaming lies in the 2020 FIDE Online Chess Olympiad which was held after the 44th Chess Olympiad was postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic, says Indian GM Srinath Narayanan. “The streaming started when I saw the interest – 70,000 people watching the final. It was amazing, the passion of the people. How willing they were to help the team in any way they could. end of the Olympiad I started streaming in about a week Narayanan belongs to the growing tribe of Indian professional chess players, enthusiasts and followers who cover professional tournaments, live stream their occasional games and/or or examine and comment on chess games played on the world professional chess circuit.

As more and more chess players have become streamers, the game has benefited immensely. It began to lose its reputation as a boring, incomprehensible puzzler. And audiences are drawn to live streams and recordings because of the lively banter and chatter that usually accompanies any match between the top, highly competitive professional chess players. The thrill of watching them defeat their opponents and explaining how they do it is a heady combination.

Example: As the first pieces move on the board, GM Gujrathi offers an alliance and GM Giri accepts his offer; FIDE Master Botez steps in with the idea that not all GMs can gang up on streamers and the alliance should be broken. Host Raina suggests that Gujrathi is a veteran of the format, and all three should team up first to take him down.

A shocked Gujrathi says in disbelief that he cannot trust the alliance with Giri and makes a move to test his loyalty. In response, a little hurt, Giri lets his bishop be taken by Gujrathi to prove him wrong. Suddenly Agadmator, silent but observant, says it makes sense to go after Gujrathi since he has an extra queen converted from a pawn. As Agadmator tells it, Gujrathi confronts Giri by targeting his bishop. Giri confidently replies that he is only defending his own bishop. As the two grandmasters resolve their little mess, Botez slyly asks Agadmator if he’s interested in working as a team to take on the GMs, as she senses a crack in their alliance.

The combination of store talk and trash talk is almost irresistible. The audience is exposed to all the nuances of calculating, swapping, combining, collaborating, cooperating, making deals, breaking deals and negotiating skills available in the players arsenal, deployed by them to gain the upper hand in the game.

While there is a lot to learn for an astute student of the game, the sheer entertainment factor of the streams combined with the interest and insight of the game itself, has made chess accessible again, says Tania Sachdev, International Masters (IM) and Woman GM. . “There is this serious image attached to chess. But suddenly seeing chess players having fun made it more accessible again. People have rekindled their love for the game and I think streaming has a big part to play in that.

Srinath confirms: “I had never seen so many people interested in chess. There were a lot of people interested in chess, but people who didn’t know how to play chess but still wanted to watch, it was something new to see.

Even though chess is said to have originated somewhere in the Indian subcontinent, the roots of the game are lost in time. But that hasn’t stopped the game from cultivating a loyal fan base in the country. “Now you have people watching people play chess. They love it when you play tournaments; they are connected with you. It definitely became something that everyone enjoyed, but there was that catalyst that was needed to make it a more mainstream thing. Everyone knew chess, but people were almost afraid to play. It can be very intimidating. But now, once you get into it, people are just addicted to the game,” Sachdev puts it.

Although live broadcasting of chess games is in its infancy in India, it presents many opportunities for growth in terms of broadcasting official tournaments, sponsorship deals, coverage and review of professional matches, interaction with viewers, subscribers and the players themselves. Ashish Pherwani, Head of Media and Entertainment for EY India, says Ashish Pherwani: “Unlike broadcast which only allows content with mass appeal, streaming allows content with niche appeal to find a house and being distributed, and chess fits into that. It’s not a mass sport, it’s extremely intellectual but it has a dedicated following. Streaming chess games offers a kind of model lower cost and lower reach, but a very dedicated fan base of people watching.

Along the same lines, Sagar Shah, IM and co-founder and CEO of ChessBase India, continues that although he started the company in 2017 with the intention of supporting the growth of the game in India, his business also increased significantly over time. . He adds that when they started there was no fixed income model other than ChessBase software brought an influx through which they could continue and maintain the website.

“Our sources of income are divided between the sale of products and the activities related to the media that we carry out. But from a collection point of view, we are very cautious. Our vision is to develop chess into the most popular sport in the country. The money will follow if we direct our energy towards growing the sport.

But the financial aspect of the game is not what drives the chess playing community and the public into each other’s arms. Rather, it’s the thrill of watching very serious and competitive professional chess players let loose and let off steam while engaging in a friendly joust against their peers.

For example, in the flow described above, the true color of the players’ intentions is revealed when Gujrathi takes Botez’s queen with his queen and Giri takes one of his pawns with his queen. In turn, she takes Gujrathi’s queen with her knight, and Giri and Gujrathi try to persuade Agadmator to go after Botez’s pieces, which will eliminate him from the game. Agadmator says if he does that, he will have to fighting alone with two GMs, which doesn’t seem like such a good idea. The alliance between the GMs comes to an abrupt end as Agadmator refuses to checkmate the King of Gujrathi, giving Gujrathi the opportunity to take the Queen of Giri.

The live stream continues like this for another hour with lots of pushes and parries of pieces forward to attack or backed up to defend, and as the game ends with Giri eliminated first, followed by Botez, all players agree that a rematch is in order as they were unfamiliar with the format. And it begins again.

Meanwhile, to satisfy your chess streaming craving, go watch the 44th Chess Olympiad taking place in Mamallapuram, Chennai. India have fielded 30 players in six teams, and streaming platforms are buzzing with the live stream, news and information from the tournament.

@pliticalyincrkt

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Chasin wins 2022 American Cadet https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chasin-wins-2022-american-cadet/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 19:20:05 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chasin-wins-2022-american-cadet/ The 2022 United States Cadet Championship took place July 7-10 at the Hyatt Regency in Schaumburg, IL. Eight of America’s top under-16 players competed for $2,000 prizes and a $10,000 scholarship sponsored by US Chess and the Dewain Barber Foundation. Wilson-Chess and King Tournaments were the co-organizers, and the event was held alongside the Chicago […]]]>

The 2022 United States Cadet Championship took place July 7-10 at the Hyatt Regency in Schaumburg, IL. Eight of America’s top under-16 players competed for $2,000 prizes and a $10,000 scholarship sponsored by US Chess and the Dewain Barber Foundation. Wilson-Chess and King Tournaments were the co-organizers, and the event was held alongside the Chicago Summer Open 2022 and Blitz.

Ranked fifth at the start of the event, FM Nico Chasin dominated the event, his six points leaving him a point and a half ahead of IM Arthur Guo in second place. I told Chasin about his victory after the tournament.

Dan: What went through your mind once you took the lead?

Nico: Once I took the lead after the third round, I thought we had four more games to play; anyone can catch me. Later in the tournament, the lead started to become more significant.

Legend

FM Nico Chasin (right) waits for MI Jason Liang to make his next move at US Cadet 2022. Photo: Micheline Wilson

Dan: At the start of the sixth round, how did you feel and what were your thoughts?

Nico: I felt good before the sixth round, but I expected the worst: Arthur would win his match against FM Bach Ngo and I would lose mine. So, going into the seventh round against Arthur Guo, I thought it would be fine, because I would have the white pieces. And if we tied and went to a playoff blitz, I felt like I could take it.

What follows is Chasin’s sixth match, where victory gave him the tournament with one round to spare. Thanks to Nico for this exclusive analysis.

Dan: One last question: with so many young chess players watching your games, what advice would you give to these young chess players who look up to you and want to be the best chess player they can be?

Nico: Make sure at the end of the day you remember [chess] is a board game; although it is more than that for many people. You just can’t panic when things don’t go your way. You have to live and learn because you won’t win every match or make perfect moves all the time.

Legend

2022 United States Cadet Champion FM Nico Chasin displays his trophy and $10,000 cash prize. Photo: Micheline Wilson

I also spoke to FM Ryo Chen who, at 12, was the youngest player on the board. Chen scored 3/7, tied for fifth place with IM Eddy Tian. Here is his match against IM Arthur Guo with his analysis, exclusively for CLO.

Legend

FM Ryo Chen (right) considers opening against IM Dimitar Mardov. Photo: Micheline Wilson

Dan: As the youngest player in the 2022 Cadet Championship, some of the young players watching you wanted me to ask what advice you would give to young children trying to become the best chess player they can be.

Ryo: Play as many games as you can. They should also do tactics, but play chess, play online, play on the board, play chess a lot.

Legend

The top finishers of the 2022 United States Cadet Championship pose with their equipment. Photo: Micheline Wilson

Quick links:

2022 United States Cadet Championship Information and Scholarship Information

American Cadet Games

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Did the best chess player in the world just give… https://tromsosjakklubb.com/did-the-best-chess-player-in-the-world-just-give/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 19:12:06 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/did-the-best-chess-player-in-the-world-just-give/ Magnus Carlsen, reigning world chess champion for 11 years, announced last week that he not defend his championship title Next year. This shocked the chess world, although Carlsen (who is usually referred to simply as Magnus) said for a time that he would not defend the title unless a promising player like 19-year-old Alireza Firouzja […]]]>

Magnus Carlsen, reigning world chess champion for 11 years, announced last week that he not defend his championship title Next year. This shocked the chess world, although Carlsen (who is usually referred to simply as Magnus) said for a time that he would not defend the title unless a promising player like 19-year-old Alireza Firouzja challenged him. . him.

Fans refer to Magnus as the “greatest of all time”, and some reacting to his news said he could not reach that status without surpassing Garry Kasparov’s record of six league titles. (Magnus has five, though the extent of these titles in the story has varied a bit.)

Magnus decided he didn’t care, at least for now. He explained that he likes to play in tournaments, but not in the championship. He has always made a point of saying how important the pleasure of chess is to him. And it’s nice to see Magnus playing chess.

“I’m not motivated to play another game. I just feel like I don’t have much to gain. I don’t particularly like it, and although I’m sure a match would be interesting for historical reasons and all that, I have no desire to play,” he said when announcing his decision.

Some said it showed he was bored or giving up. Some have speculated that Magnus would lose his competitive edge without the championship; others, that he was shirking his duties to the game.

“To walk away from what everyone expects or demands of you takes courage,” said chess great Kasparov. on Twitter on Magnus’ decision.

Peter Heine Nielsen, Magnus’ longtime trainer, said The Chicken Chess Club podcast that Magnus wants to “do different things with his life, including chess”.

“The chess world may be upset about it, but…it’s good for them,” Nielsen said. “He knows he’s the best player in the world. As long as it’s not debatable, I don’t think he needs the title.

I watched and covered professional chess for a few years, and one beautiful thing about it is that it doesn’t work like other sports. Although there is apparently a divine genius at work in these players, professional chess seems very human.

Like other sports, it offers philosophical lessons in resilience, beauty and determination. But chess stars don’t usually act like stars. For most players, chess does not pay. Some top players live with their parents or in shabby apartments.

Our culture is based on fame, but often on fame void of excellence. In high-level chess, you can’t pretend to be excellent or not. Notoriety relies on “directed self-promotion, so in many cases self-promotion is the true discipline of the person,” writes Michial Farmer on The Republic of the Porch.

In contrast, Farmer says those who seek greatness in the kingdom of God should focus on the good of the thing itself:

To take a frequent example from Plato, the telos of a shipbuilder is the ship – a ship well built to the standards of shipbuilding practice. That of the poet telos is the poem; that of the painter is painting; the intellectual is the argument. The Christian worker understands that a well-constructed object gives glory to God who gave the gifts that allowed its construction, even if the work pays no explicit attention to God. … The public should be a secondary consideration, because building a good ship, by its very nature, is helping people sail.

Whether Magnus has the chess title or not, he’s the best in the game and no one else comes close. Last weekend he won another great tournament. Even without the championship, he will likely retain his world No. 1 status according to the FIDE rating, the official measure of a chess player. The way it was best also increased global interest in chess – helping people navigate, in Farmer’s words.

Wesley So, an American ranked the world No. 6, joked in a recent chess livestream that Magnus being the best player for 11 years has been “depressing” for other players. (So ​​an outspoken Christian, wrote about his testimony for CT in 2017.)

Alongside this excellence there is a lesson on human limitation.

The Chess Championship takes months and months of preparation, with players analyzing and discovering new lines of defense and attack that they reveal during the championship. The match is 14 classic matches, spread over a few weeks. Matches sometimes last six, seven or eight hours, with no clock interruption. It’s exhausting. With chess at this level, most games end in draws, so one mistake can give your opponent a win and determine the championship. Last year, Magnus’ Russian challenger Nepomniachtchi slipped up and the championship match fell apart. Nepomniachtchi looked miserable.

Vishy Anand, a former world champion, said Chess.com he understood the exhaustion of the league matches: “Because I lost, this problem resolved itself. Magnus’ problem is a bit that he doesn’t lose.

When is the abandonment of laziness, and when is it a good understanding of our human limits?

In a meeting with Phoenix Seminary, theologian Kelly Kapic, who has a book on finitude titled you are only human, said that when he lays down to sleep at night, his main feeling is not fatigue but guilt about things he didn’t accomplish that day. He “confused finitude and sin,” he says. “I felt guilty that I was actually just a creature. … God never meant for us to do everything. Kapic goes on to explain that God places his value not on productivity but on ‘love’ , but we operate as if God is waiting for our productivity.

We can’t dive deep into Magnus’ mind, but he says he’s motivated to give up that title by his enjoyment of chess, not worldly expectations. I think it’s a good sign that he doesn’t seem to care that the governing body of chess as well as his fans want him to play for the championship. He has excellence and he says he has had enough stress for the championship so far.

But for the rest of us, whether chess players, shipbuilders, writers, or teachers, it’s a time to reflect on how we can cherish the gifts that we have with excellence while embracing our own finitude.

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A robot chess player breaks the finger of a 7-year-old boy during a game https://tromsosjakklubb.com/a-robot-chess-player-breaks-the-finger-of-a-7-year-old-boy-during-a-game/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 04:29:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/a-robot-chess-player-breaks-the-finger-of-a-7-year-old-boy-during-a-game/ Comment this story Comment A chess-playing robot broke the finger of a 7-year-old boy who was playing against each other at a recent tournament in Moscow. According to officials from the Moscow Chess Federation, the child continued his participation in the event after his finger was placed in a cast. The two officials, in comments […]]]>

Comment

A chess-playing robot broke the finger of a 7-year-old boy who was playing against each other at a recent tournament in Moscow.

According to officials from the Moscow Chess Federation, the child continued his participation in the event after his finger was placed in a cast.

The two officials, in comments to two state news agencies translated from Russian, appeared to place at least some blame for the incident on the boy.

“The child made a move, and after that we have to give the robot time to respond, but the boy rushed, the robot caught him,” said Sergey Lazarev, president of the Chess Federation from Moscow. CASS. “We have nothing to do with the robot.”

World chess champion to relinquish title because he’s just ‘not motivated’

“The robot broke the child’s finger – this, of course, is bad,” Lazarev added. “The robot was rented by us. It has been exhibited in many places, for a long time, with specialists.

“It happens – a coincidence. It is necessary, apparently, to warn the children additionally,” vice-president of the federation Sergey Smagin told RIA Novosti. “It is extremely strange that this happened , but it happened, it happens.”

Baza, a Russian online news media, reported that the robot “grabbed the boy’s index finger and squeezed it hard”. Tournament staff members rushed to help him free himself from the robot’s grip.

At the time, the robot was playing a game of chess against three children at a time. Baza described the victim as one of Moscow’s “30 strongest chess players” under the age of 9.

The child’s parents “want to contact the prosecutor’s office,” said Lazarev, who said his organization would try to help the family.

The robot was familiar to chess officials, having been in use, according to Smagin, for around 15 years. He added that, as far as he remembers, this was the first time such a thing had happened.

Smagin said there was no talk of banning the robot, but he and Lazarev suggested its operators review updated security measures.

“It will be necessary to analyze why this happened,” Smagin said. “The robot has a very talented inventor. It may be necessary to install an additional protection system.

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Chess Olympiad players will have medical coverage https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-olympiad-players-will-have-medical-coverage/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 16:15:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-olympiad-players-will-have-medical-coverage/ Tamil Nadu Department of Health will deploy medical teams and ambulances and provide screening for COVID-19 at airports, hotels and venues, in addition to providing health insurance coverage of up to ₹2 lakh each for some 1,900 players participating in the 44th Chess Olympiad Tamil Nadu Department of Health will deploy medical teams and ambulances […]]]>

Tamil Nadu Department of Health will deploy medical teams and ambulances and provide screening for COVID-19 at airports, hotels and venues, in addition to providing health insurance coverage of up to ₹2 lakh each for some 1,900 players participating in the 44th Chess Olympiad

Tamil Nadu Department of Health will deploy medical teams and ambulances and provide screening for COVID-19 at airports, hotels and venues, in addition to providing health insurance coverage of up to ₹2 lakh each for some 1,900 players participating in the 44th Chess Olympiad

As the 44th FIDE Chess Olympiad is about to begin next week, the health department is deploying medical teams and ambulances, conducting COVID-19 screening at airports, hotels and venues, monitoring food security and prepared health insurance coverage of up to ₹2 lakh to each of the approximately 1,900 players.

Players from around 180 countries are taking part in the Chess Olympiad which is due to take off on July 28. For its part, the health department is accelerating preparations, including emergency care, COVID-19 testing and food safety.

Officials said nearly 1,000 people, including medics and field officers from the department, have been drafted in after proper training. Thirty ambulances would be stationed in the hotels where the players would be accommodated.

“The players will be accommodated in 21 hotels. We therefore have a permanent medical team for three hotels. They will be available 24 hours a day. At the main site, we will have specialist doctors available in case of emergency,” said a health official.

The special medical team consisting of doctors from general medicine, surgery, anaesthesia, orthopedics and obstetrics-gynecology would be in place at the Chess Olympiad venue in Mamallapuram.

Insurance cover

If a player were to be hospitalized, the state government would pay the medical expenses for which health insurance coverage has been prepared.

“We paid a premium of ₹300 for each player under the already existing Memorandum of Understanding with United India Insurance (for the Chief Minister’s Comprehensive Health Insurance Scheme). We have a list of 1,925 players participating in the Olympiad. This will give coverage of up to ₹2 lakh per player for 15 days in private incorporated hospitals,” another official said.

The department has identified 13 hospitals in and around OMR and ECR.

Food security is one of the priority areas. “The measurements were taken two or three months ago when we started food safety training for staff in the hospitality industry. We identified hotels and undertook three or four rounds of inspections depending on the improvements There are also a number of street vendors and small eateries, as well as a number of beach side eateries in and around Mamallapuram, so we conducted special training on how to how to prepare food hygienically,” an official said.

Nearly 100 people have been delegated from other districts to monitor food safety measures at all hotels, the official said.

COVID-19 screening

For its part, the Public Health and Preventive Medicine Directorate will handle appropriate COVID-19 behavior and RT-PCR testing in addition to the monkeypox guidelines.

Officials said the tests would be carried out in accordance with the guidelines of the Indian Council of Medical Research. Two per cent of the flight’s total passengers, including players, coaches, support staff and visitors, would undergo random post-arrival testing upon arrival at the airport. All must have taken two doses of the COVID-19 vaccine and must produce a vaccination certificate or a negative RTPCR certificate taken within 72 hours before boarding, a management statement said.

A heat shield would be in place. All would be screened daily for symptoms and if found to be symptomatic, the candidate would be isolated, tested and treated according to protocol.

Apart from these measures, a sanitary control room has been set up to coordinate the work.

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Magnus Carlsen will not defend his title of world champion https://tromsosjakklubb.com/magnus-carlsen-will-not-defend-his-title-of-world-champion/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 12:47:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/magnus-carlsen-will-not-defend-his-title-of-world-champion/ GM Magnus Carlsen will not defend his world championship title against GM Ian Nepomniachtchi next year. Carlsen announced his decision on a podcast tuesday. According to current regulations, the winner of the FIDE Candidates tournament, Nepomniachtchi, will now play for the world championship against GM Ding Liren, runner-up Candidates. “I’ve spoken to people on my […]]]>

GM Magnus Carlsen will not defend his world championship title against GM Ian Nepomniachtchi next year. Carlsen announced his decision on a podcast tuesday. According to current regulations, the winner of the FIDE Candidates tournament, Nepomniachtchi, will now play for the world championship against GM Ding Liren, runner-up Candidates.

“I’ve spoken to people on my team, I’ve spoken to FIDE, I’ve spoken to Ian as well. The conclusion is very simple: I’m not motivated to play another game,” Carlsen said. “I don’t have much to gain. I don’t particularly like it, and although I’m sure a game would be interesting for historical reasons, I have no desire to play and I won’t play everything. just not the game.”

Carlsen thus confirmed the previous doubts he had expressed on December 14, 2021 and repeated later: after playing five world championship matches, he no longer enjoys them.

“It’s been an interesting race since I decided to take on the Candidates in 2013, which was to be honest on a whim. I just decided it might be interesting, and since the title of world champion brought me a lot and opened a lot of doors for me, and I’m happy about that.The matches themselves were sometimes interesting, sometimes a little fun.

The Norwegian star leaves the door open to return one day for a match, but it’s unlikely: “I’m not ruling out participation in the future, but I wouldn’t count on it either.”

Carlsen made his claims in the first episode of the new “The Magnus Effect” podcast.

During the FIDE Candidates Tournament, Carlsen had a meeting with FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich and General Manager Emil Sutovsky, which apparently did not have enough effect to convince Carlsen to defend his title a fifth time.

Speaking about that reunion in Madrid, Carlsen said: “I didn’t have any requests or suggestions for that reunion. They had some suggestions, but the main thing was that I was there to tell them that I wouldn’t be defending my title in the of the next WCC match.”

Dvorkovich told Chess.com he respects the world champion’s decision and confirmed that under the rules there will now be a Ding-Nepomniachtchi match.

Ding and Nepomniachtchi will now play for the world championship. Photo: Maria Emelianova/Chess.com.

It turns out that Carlsen never really changed his mind about a feeling he had for a while. “At the end of the day, the conclusion is valid, one that I’m quite comfortable with, one that I’ve been thinking about a lot for a long time now,” he said. “I would say over a year, probably a year and a half. Long before the last game.”

It didn’t help that Nepomniachtchi qualified for a second game with Carlsen, who earlier said he preferred a new generation opponent, especially GM Alireza Firouzja. “Four championships to five, that meant nothing to me. It was nothing,” Carlsen said in yesterday’s podcast. “I was happy with the job I had done. I was happy not to have lost the match. But that was it.”

Carlsen also reiterated once again that he intended to continue playing, but no matches: “Just so there is no ambiguity here: I am not retiring from chess. I will be an active player. I’m leaving later today to go to Croatia to play the Grand Chess Tour. From there I’m going to Chennai to play the Olympiad, which is going to be a lot of fun, and the team Norway is ranked number four there. And in Miami which is going to be one of the real highlights of the year – the FTX Crypto Cup which is going to be awesome. And right after that, the Sinquefield Cup.

Ding Liren: “A New Era”

“There are a lot of feelings in my mind right now that I have to deal with,” Ding said in an initial reaction to Chess.com. “But I’m very excited to play a world championship game to fight for the crown next year.”

Calling from Barcelona, ​​where Ding is staying in a friend’s apartment, he revealed he caught Covid just after the Candidates Tournament and has therefore not yet been able to return to China. Now fully recovered, he will be back in about two weeks. The Chinese player is surprised by Carlsen’s decision:

“I knew he had doubts, but I expected him to play. But I understand that too. Being world champion means a lot of responsibility, there are a lot of things to deal with.”

Ding Liren Zoom Call
Ding Liren in a Zoom call from Barcelona with Chess.com.

Ding pointed out the similarities with Yuzuru Hanyu, the Japanese figure skater who also yesterday announcement retired from competition but promised to pursue his goal in exhibitions instead.

The chess world has had previous moments in history when the world champion failed to defend his title. In 1946 GM Alexander Alekhine died as defending champion. A world championship tournament, held two years later, was won by GM Mikhail Botvinnik. In 1975, General Manager Bobby Fischer could not agree with FIDE on the format of the match and lost his title to the winner of the Candidates, General Manager Anatoly Karpov.

In 1993, GM Garry Kasparov left FIDE and played a World Championship under the Professional Chess Association instead. This led to a schism in the chess world that lasted until 2006, when GM Vladimir Kramnik won a reunification match with FIDE champion GM Veselin Topalov.

“It’s not an ideal situation that the best player doesn’t defend their title, and creating your own organization isn’t great either,” Ding said, adding, “It’s better for the fans if the best players are fighting for the world championship, and Magnus has of course been the best player over the years. We have entered a new era.”

Ding said he hoped Carlsen would “come back one day” and felt reaching the highest possible competition also gave him a new responsibility: “I have to improve my English now!”

Ian Nepomniachtchi: “Quite disappointing”

Update: Later in the day, Chess.com also spoke to Nepomniachtchi, after completing the first three rounds of the Super United Croatia Rapid & Blitz in Zagreb, Croatia.

“It was not a shock because it was surely not the first time that I had heard of his intentions,” he said. “We also chatted briefly online after Madrid, and it was pretty clear that he probably wouldn’t play. But, as they say, hope dies last. Frankly, it’s quite disappointing. The second leg was something something I was really looking forward to.”

Ian Nepomniachtchi on Ding Liren's game
Nepomniachtchi calling from Zagreb, Croatia.

In more general terms, the challenger thinks Carlsen’s decision is not good for the chess world. “It’s quite harmful, but at this point it’s hard to assess how harmful it is,” Nepomniachtchi said. “From a human point of view, it’s a pretty understandable decision on Magnus’ part and I totally respect it, despite my personal disappointment that it happened. However, we have this great tradition in chess of almost 150 years, and that’s something really priceless.”

Of facing Ding instead, Nepomniachtchi said, “I would say that chess-wise, overall, his chess skills could easily match Magnus’s. Ding was hands down one of the best players of the last few years. He’s also had that 100 game unbeaten streak, which is something. He’s got a very different style though, he’s a very different person, a very different player and a very serious opponent . It will be hard!”

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International Chess Day: Remembering, respecting the place of the game in history https://tromsosjakklubb.com/international-chess-day-remembering-respecting-the-place-of-the-game-in-history/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 11:00:51 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/international-chess-day-remembering-respecting-the-place-of-the-game-in-history/ If your life depended on winning a chess match and you and your opponent had already moved 10 times across the board, you would need Dr. Strange by your side to show you “all the possible outcomes of the conflict at come” as he said. on “Avengers: Infinity War”. More on that later. Long before […]]]>

If your life depended on winning a chess match and you and your opponent had already moved 10 times across the board, you would need Dr. Strange by your side to show you “all the possible outcomes of the conflict at come” as he said. on “Avengers: Infinity War”.

More on that later.

Long before the arrival of mobile games like Fruit Ninja, Candy Crush or the much more interactive Mobile Legends: Bang Bang, board games were practically the darlings of gamers.

Board games were – and to some extent still are – popular for a variety of reasons. First, it was a great excuse for social interaction. Friends could get together on a weeknight and spend hours jostling, laughing, and enjoying each other’s company.

However, if there were two people who wanted to take their game to the next level, chess was a good option. Chess is a game of war strategy played on a square wooden board with 64 squares arranged in an eight-by-eight grid; the colors of these squares alternate between green and white.

Each player then receives 16 “coins”; each piece assigned a particular “role”. One player receives the black pieces, the other receives the white pieces. The six different types of pieces are: king (1), queen (1), rook (2), bishop (2), knight (2), and pawn (8).

The mechanics may seem complex at first, but once you’ve played two or three games with a friend, you’ll most certainly understand the basics. The next challenge is to come up with an offensive or defensive strategy that will help you win. It is during this phase that the learning curve varies from player to player.

American mathematician Claude Shannon tried to calculate the number of ways to play chess and published an article in 1950 entitled “Programming a computer to play chess”. The results were stunning. His calculations revealed that after each player moved a piece five times each, there are 69,352,859,712,417 possible games that could have been played. What about data?

Even the Sorcerer Supreme would have to do a ton of math to help you win a foolproof game of chess.

From an aesthetic point of view, some people collect different chess boards for their different finishes, colors and appearances of their pieces. There are basic ones in wood and others in acrylic or glass! This is one of the reasons why almost every household used to have at least one chessboard in the living room, either as a design piece or as a game that hosts can easily present to guests.

While the popularity of chess in all walks of life has drastically declined due to the rise of electronic mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets, and the myriad of mobile games available at its disposal, it has carved out a place for itself. in the history of the game.

In fact, even a modern mobile multiplayer online battle arena game like Mobile Legends: Bang Bang pays homage to the hallowed strategy game, although it has made its own modifications and calls the game mode “Magic Chess”.

From its normalization in the 1800s to the official recognition of World Chess Day every July 20 recently in 2019, the game of chess is still very much on the minds of casual fans and curious players alike. Only time will tell until a new generation of gamers pick up the pieces and rediscover their desire to share a human connection through a friendly game of strategy and patience.

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Chess ‘Match of the Century’ adviser Nikolai Krogius dies at 91 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-match-of-the-century-adviser-nikolai-krogius-dies-at-91/ Sun, 17 Jul 2022 17:48:40 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/chess-match-of-the-century-adviser-nikolai-krogius-dies-at-91/ In September 1972, a small group of Russian chess grandmasters headed for Moscow on a plane, ominously anticipating the welcome they would receive there. The group included Boris Spassky, who had just lost the world championship title to Bobby Fischer, the mercurial American player, and Nikolai Krogius, who had been part of the team assisting […]]]>

In September 1972, a small group of Russian chess grandmasters headed for Moscow on a plane, ominously anticipating the welcome they would receive there. The group included Boris Spassky, who had just lost the world championship title to Bobby Fischer, the mercurial American player, and Nikolai Krogius, who had been part of the team assisting Mr. Spassky during the match in Reykjavik, Iceland .

The competition, described as the “match of the century” by many, had taken on geopolitical connotations against the backdrop of the Cold War. The loss of Mr. Spassky was considered a disaster in the Soviet Union, and the band members feared punishment for their collective and individual failures.

Writing about the episode almost 30 years later, Mr Krogius said it was not as bad as they had feared. When they met with members of the Soviet and Russian sports committees, the discussion was “calm and professional” and immediately turned to what could be done to return the title to the Soviet Union.

It happened three years later when Mr Fischer chose to resign the title rather than play Anatoly Karpov. But the 1972 match remained a turning point in chess history, for which Mr. Krogius had a front row seat.

Mr. Krogius died Thursday in New York, where he had lived for many years. His death was confirmed by the International Chess Federation, which did not specify the cause. He was 91 years old.

While Mr. Krogius was an accomplished player — he was world No. 26 at the time of the 1972 match — he was part of Mr. Spassky’s entourage for another reason: he was a sports psychologist and was there to give a overview of Mr. Fischer. He had also worked with Mr. Spassky before the game to try to prepare for it, but as Mr. Krogius wrote years later, Mr. Spassky had been a difficult and reluctant student.

The problems got worse once the game started. Mr. Fischer began making demands, including that Game 3 be played in a back room and not on the main stage in front of an audience. Mr. Spassky acquiesced in them all, which, as Mr. Krogius noted, was his nature.

Mr. Krogius tried to convince him to resist, but to no avail. “Spassky couldn’t bring himself to do it,” Mr. Krogius wrote in a two-volume history of Boris Spassky and the match with Fischer, published in 1998 and 2000. “He gave in and so, gradually, but inevitably, lost the psychological struggle.”

Mr. Krogius was born on July 22, 1930 in Saratov, Russia, a port on the Volga. His development as a chess player was steady but slow, as the Soviet Union in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s had an unrivaled collection of talent and it was difficult for any player to break through. In addition, Mr. Krogius was preparing his doctorate in psychology.

He qualified for the Soviet Championship – the most elite tournament in the world at the time – for the first time in 1958, finishing tied for ninth. He went on to play in six more championships until 1971, although he never came close to winning.

He won the Grandmaster title after winning the Chigorin Memorial in Sochi, Russia, in 1964. Mr. Krogius was ranked No. 18 in the world in 1967, according to Chessmetrics, a site that ranks players 200 years ago. based on their performance. Around this time, he began working with Mr. Spassky and helping him prepare for his matches.

Mr. Krogius was a vital member of Mr. Spassky’s team when Mr. Spassky won the world championship in 1969 by beating Tigran Petrosian, the defending champion at the time. It was because of this experience that he stayed with Mr. Spassky for the 1972 game.

After this match, Mr. Krogius began to play less often, concentrating more on writing and becoming active in the Soviet chess hierarchy.

He served as the President of the Soviet Chess Federation and was the head of Mr. Karpov’s delegation in his final World Championship match against Garry Kasparov in 1990, a match which Mr. Kasparov won.

Among M. Krogius’s books, “Psychology in Chess” (RHM Press, 1976) is considered one of the best treatises on how players think during games and what they can do to reduce their mistakes. . Mr. Spassky wrote the introduction, emphasizing the importance of understanding psychology to becoming a good chess player.

In the 1990s, Mr. Krogius returned to competition and finished tied for first at the Senior World Championship in 1993.

Mr. Krogius continued to work as a trainer and trainer, relocating to Staten Island in New York with his wife, Irina, with whom he had two daughters, Olga and Maria.

Information about survivors was not immediately available.

His most famous student in the United States while coaching was Irina Krush, who became an eight-time United States Women’s Champion.

Just after the 1972 match, Mr. Krogius met Mr. Fischer at a reception in Reykjavik. They spoke in Russian, which Mr. Fischer had learned by reading Soviet chess publications. Mr. Fischer admitted that he had read some of the things Mr. Krogius had written about psychology, although he found it difficult because Mr. Krogius did not write exclusively about chess.

Suddenly, Mr. Fischer quoted a line that Mr. Krogius had written: “Mistakes are often made when a player persists in his delusions.

Surprised, Mr. Krogius replied: “Perhaps this thought guided you during the preparation for the match? We saw a brand new Fischer in Reykjavik, very different from the old one.

Mr. Fischer smiled and walked away.

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Will promote chess in schools, colleges: Cm | Bhubaneswar News https://tromsosjakklubb.com/will-promote-chess-in-schools-colleges-cm-bhubaneswar-news/ Sat, 16 Jul 2022 02:58:00 +0000 https://tromsosjakklubb.com/will-promote-chess-in-schools-colleges-cm-bhubaneswar-news/ Bhubaneswar: Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik said on Friday that Odisha plans to promote chess in schools and colleges professionally.He was speaking at an event to mark the arrival of the first-ever relay torch for the Chess Olympiad here. “We intend to further strengthen the game across the state, especially in schools. It’s a game that […]]]>
Bhubaneswar: Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik said on Friday that Odisha plans to promote chess in schools and colleges professionally.
He was speaking at an event to mark the arrival of the first-ever relay torch for the Chess Olympiad here. “We intend to further strengthen the game across the state, especially in schools. It’s a game that can be easily spread because little infrastructure or equipment is needed,” said Naveen.
“We will regularly organize competitions at the school and college level and promote the game in a professional manner,” he added.
The CM further said it was a proud moment for India as it hosts an international sporting event like the Chess Olympiad in its 75th year of independence, scheduled in Chennai from July 28 to August 10. More than 2,000 participants from 187 countries are likely to participate. in the event.
Naveen passed the baton of the baton to Padmini Rout, a state chess player. Previously chess player Kiran Manisha Mohanty brought the relay torch to Loka Seva Bhawan and handed it over to the main patron of the All Odisha Chess Association, Achyuta Samanta. The CM received the torch from Samant.
Kiran and Padmini are famous international chess players from Odisha. Six players from Odisha will participate in the Chess Olympiad to be held in Chennai.
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